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Asexual man explains what it means to be ace – and why he’s ‘not missing out’ – in 60 perfect seconds

Lily Wakefield November 20, 2020
asexual awareness week

A participant holds a sign that says "The "A" is for asexual" during the Glasgow Pride march on August 19, 2017 in Glasgow, Scotland.(Robert Perry/Getty)

BBC Radio 1 gave an asexual man the chance to educate listeners, and he perfectly explained why he’s “not missing out” in under a minute.

Last month, Radio 1 put a call out to young people “who feel they struggle to be heard or seen by those around them”, and gave them the chance to tell their stories in one minute.

“Minute of Me” has been airing this week, and has included multiple LGBT+ voices.

One story came from David, a man described what it’s like to be asexual and debunked some myths.

He said: “Being asexual means I don’t experience sexual attraction to anyone, and that’s it. It’s not the same as celibacy or abstinence, and it doesn’t mean I don’t want a romantic relationship.

“It’s a sexual orientation, just like any other. There’s no reason for it, it’s just the way I am, and it doesn’t mean I’m incapable of love.

“Growing up, I always knew I was different. It took me a long time to figure out why. Looking back, so many moments suddenly make sense.

Being asexual means doesn’t mean being ‘broken’.

David added: “The world is dominated by sex, and I celebrate that, but it can feel isolating sometimes. For someone like me, friendships mean a lot more.

“Other than that, I lead a perfectly normal life. I’m not missing out, it’s just not my thing. I am not broken.”

Other “Minute of Me” speakers include a non-binary trans person discussing online abuse, someone living with HIV and someone who is non-binary and living with autism.

Radio 1 breakfast host Greg James said: “During the pandemic it feels like we’ve got closer to our listeners than ever.

“They’ve helped us through the bleak times just as much as we’ve helped them. We’re not afraid to reflect real life on Radio 1, and as well as offering an escape from the sometimes harsh realities of life, we also need to use our platform to make sure as many people as possible are given an opportunity to be heard.”

Aled Haydn Jones, head of Radio 1, added: “Many young people have struggled to find a voice in what has been an incredibly challenging year for us all, so we’re giving them a chance to do exactly that and tell us what they would say if they were given a national platform.

“We want people to hear directly from the next generation and listen to what’s important to them, and I’m pleased Radio 1 is able to help share their stories.”

More: asexual, BBC Radio 1, minute of me

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