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Elizabeth Warren drops out of White House race, leaving two old white men to battle Donald Trump, an old white man

Josh Milton March 5, 2020
Senator Elizabeth Warren

Senator Elizabeth Warren. (Sarah Silbiger/Getty)

Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren, unflinching in her advocacy for the LGBT+ community and determination to wipe the White House of corruption, has ended her presidential bid Thursday after devasting losses in the primaries.

Once a formidable front-runner pursuing a job never once held by a woman, the former law professor’s brand of an avalanche of papers detailing lengthy plans to reshape social and economic policy was crippled and stunted by loss in its final weeks.

After coming third place in her own home state during Super Tuesday, Warren, 70, made the announcement on Twitter her decision to withdraw from the race.

Who she endorses remains unknown, but political fortunes of the endorsement are insurmountable.

From suggesting her vice president may be non-binary to using the public stage to draw invaluable attention to the disproportionate violence trans women face, the lawmaker’s indelible and impassioned support earned her the backing of two in 10 LGBT+ voters.

A campaign of tireless trans activism and biting anti-billionaire quips.

Warren, at times, electrified heaving crowds of voters during campaign rallies as well as fought tirelessly in Democratic debates. Over time, however, her support base eroded.

She launched herself into a race typically packed with lithe grey hair and big bank accounts. Proving that through policy plans, urgent anti-corruption pledges and funding a campaign without fund-raisers, a credible campaign can be made.

Elizabeth Warren sent jolts of electricity through the progressive elite, but her campaign failed attract working-class and ethnically diverse voters. (Megan Jelinger / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
Elizabeth Warren sent jolts of electricity through the progressive elite, but her campaign failed attract working-class and ethnically diverse voters. (Megan Jelinger / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Her “I have a plan for that!” quip became a rallying cry for her progressive voting bloc and as fellow female contenders withdrew campaigns, she keyed her speeches with inspirational feminist messages. Vowing to press on.

Why was she running for president? A young girl at a town hall once asked her.

“Because that’s just what girls do,” she said.

Elizabeth Warren dropping out leaves two old, white men left to battle Donald Trump, an old, white man.

Elizabeth Warren sharply jettisoned herself away from moderate candidates and bluntly drove former New York mayor and centrist billionaire Michael Bloomberg out of the race with her fierce debate tact.

Plumbing from her biography of being a top advisor of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, she dished out scathing indictments against capitalism.

But as centrist candidates, such as Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar, bowed out, it saw the moderate wing of Democratic voters coalesce around former vice president Joe Biden. Her presence chaffed against rival Bernie Sanders, splitting the left vote and saw more flock to the Vermont senator.

The senator political stock slipped overtime through her campaign, one she pitched as being the 'unity candidate'. (JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)
The senator political stock slipped over time through her campaign, one she pitched as being the ‘unity candidate’. (JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

After investing heavily into early caucus votes with an enviable action plan to court voters, it failed to pay off. Warren’s position in the polls slid downwards at a nauseating speed, failing to net the numbers she needed to stay afloat.

By bowing out, the path is now all clear for 77-year-old Sanders, whose radical platform of democratic socialism encroached on the very voters Warren hoped to be a lightning rod for.

While the race has, ultimately, whittled down to two salt-haired septuagenarians, Warren has, above all, become a pacesetter for how presidential candidates should and can go above and beyond to empower the LGBT+ community.

After a queer teen broke down crying in front of her, Warren adjusted her red cardigan and, with a small smile, said: “We’re going to be OK. You’re going to get through this.

“You’re going to be good.”

More: 2020 democratic nomination, Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren, joe biden

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