Menu

InstagramTwitterYouTubeFacebookSnapchat
Globe Icon
Current Affairs

One in five bisexual people have been sexually assaulted at work, study finds

Ella Braidwood September 23, 2019

A report has found bisexual people are less likely to be out at work than their lesbian or gay colleagues. (energepic.com/Pexels)

One in five bisexual people have been sexually assaulted at work, according to recent research.

The findings – taken from a May 2019 report titled Sexual harassment of LGBT people in the workplace – also revealed that bisexual employees are notably less likely to be out at work than their gay or lesbian colleagues.

Nearly one quarter of bisexual respondents wanted to leave work after being victims of sexual harassment.

The Trades Union Congress (TUC), which commissioned the study, highlighted the results in an article to mark Bi Visibility Day on Monday, September 23.

Some 22 percent of bi women and 20 percent of bi men said they had been sexually assaulted at work – including unwanted touching of the breasts, buttocks or genitals – compared to 21 percent of all respondents.

bullying in the workplace
The report found that one in five bisexual people have been sexually assaulted at work. (Envato)

The study further found that sexual harassment had made nearly one in four (24 percent) bisexual workers want to leave their job.

More than one fifth (22 percent) of affected bisexual respondents in the study also said that being a victim of sexual harassment had a negative impact on their mental health.

Bisexual people significantly less likely to be out at work than gay or lesbian peers.

The report also concluded that more than eight in 20 bi employees were not out to anyone at work – compared to three out of 20 lesbian or gay staff members.

Quinn Roache, a policy officer in the TUC’s equalities and strategy department, said in a blog post: “This shows us that it is harder for bi workers to be truly authentic at work and that more needs to be done to enable them to bring their whole selves to work.

“This is why it is vital employers, policy makers and trade unions (their reps and members) understand the impact of sexual harassment is different for different marginalised groups.

“It is only when this is truly understood that any intervention that is introduced will address the issue.”

This shows us that it is harder for bi workers to be truly authentic at work and that more needs to be done to enable them to bring their whole selves to work.

Bi Visibility Day, celebrated annually since 1999, is an event that celebrates the bi community and its culture, as well as recognising bisexual history.

However, Bi Visibility Day – also known as International Celebrate Bisexuality Day – highlights biphobia, too, and the continued discrimination faced by the bisexual community.

More: bi visibility day, bisexual, sexual assault, trades union congress

Read comments (0)

Close icon