Menu

InstagramTwitterYouTubeFacebookSnapchat
Globe Icon
US

Queer Eye’s hipster mayor Ted Terry is running for senate

Lily Wakefield July 10, 2019
Clarkston mayor Ted Terry is running for senate.

Clarkston mayor Ted Terry is running for senate. (Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)

The millennial mayor of Clarkston, Georgia, who appeared in an episode of Queer Eye, is officially running for US senate.

Ted Terry, otherwise known as the “hipster mayor,” appeared in the last episode of Season 2 “Make Ted Great Again” in which Jonathan Van Ness convinced him to ditch his beard.

Progressive democrat Terry is going after the Georgia seat held by republican Trump supporter David Perdue.

Terry told Atlanta Magazine that he wants “to bring a new generation of leadership to the Senate—a new perspective.”

He continued: “The median age of the Senate is over 60 years old, and there is no voice representing what would be the largest voting block in America in 2020—the under 35-year-old voting block.”

Clarkston, the small town which Terry is mayor of, is said to be the most diverse square mile in America.

“Fifty percent of [Clarkston] is foreign-born, and yet crime hasn’t spiked; we’re one of the safest cities in Georgia,” he told the magazine.

“We haven’t gone bankrupt; we’re one of the fastest growing suburbs in the nation. Our new Americans represent the best of what America has to offer.”

Mayor Ted Terry getting makeover on Queer Eye
Mayor Ted Terry getting his hair cut and beard shaved. (Netflix/Queer Eye)

Mayor Ted Terry has all of his meetings in local coffee shops, parks and restaurants

His actions as mayor have been supportive of the LGBT+ community, and according to his campaign website, he oversaw Clarkston becoming “the third city in Georgia to pass a sweeping non-discrimination ordinance,” and “signed on to the Amicus Brief on LGBTQ+ Employment Discrimination.”

As senator he said he would like to continue the open and welcoming attitude he has established as mayor.

He told Atlanta Magazine: “My first year as mayor, I got rid of my mayoral office and opted to have all of my meetings out in the public at local coffee shops, parks and restaurants… I will bring that same level of transparency to the Senate office.”

Read comments (0)

Close icon