Menu

InstagramTwitterYouTubeFacebookSnapchat
Globe Icon
Join and support LGBT+ journalism

Join

and support
LGBT+ journalism

Current Affairs

10 incredible pictures of India exploding in ecstasy as gay sex legalised

Josh Jackman September 6, 2018
Indian members and supporters of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community celebrate the Supreme Court decision to strike down a colonial-era ban on gay sex, in Mumbai on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE / AFP) (Photo credit should read INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images)

Campaigners in India celebrate the repeal of a law which banned sexual activity "against the order of nature" (INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty)

The Indian Supreme Court struck down a ban on gay sex on Thursday, which was first put in place 157 years ago—and people were ready to celebrate.

Consensual gay sex, a crime previously punishable by life in prison, was decriminalised in a unanimous verdict which saw Justice Indu Malhotra—the only woman on the bench—strongly condemn the colonial Section 377 law.

She told the court: “History owes an apology to these people persecuted by Section 377 for the social ostracism caused by the section.”

Justice Indu Malhotra (MyLaw/youtube)

Justice DY Chandrachud said that LGBT+ people “have equal rights,” adding that “this case is much more than just decriminalising a provision.

“It is about an aspiration to realise constitutional rights and the equal existence of the LGBT community as other citizens.

“To deny LGBT community of their right to sexual orientation is a denial of their citizenship and a violation of their privacy.

Justice DY Chandrachud (Jindal Global University/youtube)

“They cannot be pushed into obscurity by an oppressive colonial legislation,” he continued.

“Treatment of homosexuality as a disorder/ disease has a severe impact on the mental health of such persons. Decriminalisation is but the first step; the constitution envisages much more.”

The judge added that LGBT+ people had been the “victims of Victorian morality.”

Since July, the court has been hearing testimonies from celebrities and numerous petitions arguing for gay sex between consenting adults to be legalised.

The controversial legislation has been widely used to clamp down on the LGBT+ community in India, which is home to 1.3 billion people.

All of this explains the glorious, emotional scenes of joy and pride in response to the ruling.

The Supreme Court’s decision prompted a long-awaited release for LGBT+ people in the country, after years of campaigning in the face of state-legislated discrimination.

Some people cheered, letting their delight and relief out in a collective roar.

Indian members and supporters of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community celebrate the Supreme Court decision to strike down a colonial-era ban on gay sex, in Mumbai on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE / AFP) (Photo credit should read INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images)
The law banned sexual activity “against the order of nature” (INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty)
Indian members and supporters of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community celebrate the Supreme Court decision to strike down a colonial-era ban on gay sex, in Mumbai on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE / AFP) (Photo credit should read INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images)
Section 377 originated in colonial times (INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty)

Others embraced, brought together by relief as much as anything, stunned and happy at the news that they don’t have to hide in the shadows anymore.

Indian members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community celebrate outside the Supreme Court after the decision to strike down the colonial-era ban on gay sex in New Delhi on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by Sajjad HUSSAIN / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Some showed their happiness by holding onto the people closest to them (SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty)
Indian members and supporters of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community celebrate the Supreme Court decision to strike down a colonial-era ban on gay sex, in Mumbai on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE / AFP) (Photo credit should read INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images)
The decision was unanimous (INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty)
Indian members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community celebrate outside the Supreme Court after the decision to strike down the colonial-era ban on gay sex in New Delhi on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by Sajjad HUSSAIN / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Activists celebrate the momentous ruling (SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty)
Indian members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community celebrate outside the Supreme Court after the decision to strike down the colonial-era ban on gay sex in New Delhi on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by Sajjad HUSSAIN / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian LGBT+ people are free to love whoever they want (SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty)

And still more queer folk in the country chose to respond to the historic decision by making a public statement.

The fearless pride on show is wonderful to see.

Some baked rainbow cakes (desikrys/twitter)
Public pride in action (indiaculturelab/instagram)
Indian members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community hold placards outside the Supreme Court building as crowds gathered to celebrate the decision to strike down the colonial-era ban on gay sex in New Delhi on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by Sajjad HUSSAIN / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty Images)
“Bi bi haters” (SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty)
An Indian member of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community wears a badge against Section 377 of the Indian penal code as they waited on a Supreme Court decision on whether to strike down the colonial-era ban on gay sex, in Mumbai on September 6, 2018. - India's Supreme Court on September 6 struck down the ban that has been at the centre of years of legal battles. "The law had become a weapon for harassment for the LGBT community," Chief Justice Dipak Misra said as he announced the landmark verdict. (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE / AFP) (Photo credit should read INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images)
Section 377 has been used to crack down on LGBT+ people (INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty)

More: Asia, Asia, court, decriminalisation, Gay, gay sex, India, India, Law, section 377, Sex, supreme court

Click to comment

Swipe sideways to view more posts!

Dismiss

Loading ...

Close icon