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Cambridge University hires professor who said being gay is ‘wrong’

Josh Jackman July 5, 2018

Wall wrote that (Instituto Balseiro - Académico/youtube and Aron Wall)

The University of Cambridge has employed a lecturer who wrote that homosexuality is “notoriously promiscuous, reckless and obscene.”

Aron Wall, an American academic who is due to join the prestigious university in January, also said that “homosexual relationships are morally problematic,” adding that “lesbianism is also wrong.”

Wall made the comments on his blog, “Undivided Looking,” in an essay called “Reflections on Gay Marriage,” which he posted a month after the Supreme Court legalised same-sex marriage across the US.

Wall wrote that the gay community was “notoriously promiscuous, reckless and obscene” (Instituto Balseiro – Académico/youtube)

According to his blog, Wall will be studying quantum gravity and black hole thermodynamics as a lecturer at Cambridge.

In the post, the professor added that people “who seek to normalise gay relationships should start by taking a long and hard look at previous cultures in which it was culturally tolerated for many generations, and ask whether they would really want to live in a society like those.”

He followed this up by accusing gay people of partaking exclusively in “unnatural sex acts,” before telling his readers that “what gay people need is to turn to Christ.”

He will be studying quantum gravity and black hole thermodynamics as a lecturer at Cambridge (Instituto Balseiro – Académico/youtube)

Wall added that “if they cannot accept this, it is far better that they should live in a committed exclusive relationship, than that they should live the notoriously promiscuous, reckless, and obscene lifestyle characteristic of the cultural venues of the gay community.”

He continued: “You simply can’t extend an institution like Democracy or Marriage to a new group of people without first giving them a crash course in what the necessary working rules for that institution are.”

Apparently you can, seeing as a study published earlier this year showed that same-sex marriages are less likely to end than straight ones.

Students have voiced concerns about Wall’s blog post (Instituto Balseiro – Académico/youtube)

Gay and lesbian couples are also happier than straight couples, according to research released last year.

But according to Wall in 2015, “the existence of gay marriage will accelerate certain harmful trends in how straight people percieve [sic] marriage, but not by very much.

“For the most part, it hurts only the gay couple themselves, and anyone who cares about their well-being.”

In a statement, a spokesperson for the University of Cambridge told PinkNews: “While we do not comment on individual employment issues, all employees are subject to University policies and procedures from their first day in post, and are expected to uphold our values.

The university said it expects lecturers to show “mutual respect and consideration to all other members of our community” (Mark Fosh/Flickr)

“These include showing mutual respect and consideration to all other members of our community.”

Cambridge University Student Union’s LGBT+ campaign president Alistair Hyde told Cambridge News that he was wondering whether the university’s hiring process was “careful or thorough enough.”

Wall said that “the existence of gay marriage will accelerate certain harmful trends” (Instituto Balseiro – Académico/youtube)

Hyde added: “It would be inappropriate to pair an LGBT+ student with a supervisor known to be prejudiced against members of this particular marginalised group.

“Students will demand safeguarding policies when people are hired that are openly homophobic or prejudiced against marginalised groups.”

More: aron wall, Cambridge, Education, Religion, UK, universities, University of Cambridge, US

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