Trans

A transgender woman has been brutally murdered after an argument over £6

Josh Jackman May 8, 2018
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Pakistan's transgender community protest against hate crimes

Trans activists demonstrate in Peshawar, Pakistan (A.MAJEED/AFP/Getty)

A transgender woman has been shot dead because she didn’t have change for £6.

The victim was one of two transgender women invited to dance at a wedding in Kotkay, in northern Pakistan.

Police said that she was handed a 1,000 rupee note – about £6 – by a man who asked for change so he could shower the trans dancers with money during the party.

A Pakistani transgender activist poses for a photograph as they take part in a demonstration in Karachi on November 20, 2017. The event was held to mark World Transgender Day. / AFP PHOTO / ASIF HASSAN (Photo credit should read ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)
(ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty)

She told the man that she had no change for him – so he shot her in the head.

She is the 57th trans person to be killed in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa region in the last three years.

The victim’s fellow dancer at the wedding, Kismat Khan, told Pakistani news outlet DawnNews that the alleged murderer had fired his gun twice in the air before taking aim.

Pakistani transgender activists take part in a demonstration in Karachi on November 20, 2017. The event was held to mark World Transgender Day. / AFP PHOTO / ASIF HASSAN (Photo credit should read ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)
(ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty)

She said they had been invited to perform at the wedding by a friend of the accused.

“We both hail from Kehal area of Abbottabad and settled down in Mansehra to earn a livelihood through dancing,” added Khan.

Trans activists reportedly took to the streets in protest of the cold-blooded killing, blocking roads to demand that the accused was arrested.

One leading advocate, Maria Khan, said: “Our community members are being killed without any reason in the entire province, but the police have failed to protect us.

Pakistani eunuchs and transgenders demonstrate for their rights in the city of Peshawar on July 11, 2011. Pakistan's eunuchs are traditionally paid to help celebrate the birth of a son, or to dance at weddings or living on the streets begging or prostituting themselves. But in Muslim Pakistan, where sexual relations outside marriage are taboo and homosexuality is illegal, eunuchs are also treated as sex objects and often become the victims of violent assault. AFP PHOTO/A. MAJEED (Photo credit should read A.MAJEED/AFP/Getty Images)
(A.MAJEED/AFP/Getty)

“Who will provide us security? People kill us if we don’t meet their immoral demands.”

Rab Nawaz, a police officer in Mansehra, said the suspect had a history of murder, having killed his uncle.

He promised that “the accused will soon be arrested.”

Human Rights Watch called the murder a “senseless attack” which showed “how cheap these lives are considered.”

Pakistani eunuchs and their supporters protest in the wake of the killing of transgender female Alisha, in Lahore on May 28, 2016. Alisha, who was shot eight times earlier this week allegedly by a disgruntled customer, succumbed to her wounds at Peshawar's Lady Reading Hospital on May 25. The 25-year-old's murder is the fifth reported case of violence against trans people in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa this year. / AFP / ARIF ALI (Photo credit should read ARIF ALI/AFP/Getty Images)
(ARIF ALI/AFP/Getty)

The group added: “Not only has the K-P government failed to protect its transgender citizens, it has also failed to hold perpetrators accountable.”

Pakistan had made numerous moves to give trans people a better quality of life, but has not been able to stop transphobic violence.

The country allows for trans people to obtain a ‘third gender’ passport.

Transgender people can also be legally recognised as their gender without medical approval.

The group that took the Boy Scouts oath (Trans Action Pakistan/Facebook)
(Trans Action Pakistan/Facebook)

In February, 40 trans people joined the Pakistan Boy Scouts Association in a landmark move.

And the country welcomed its first transgender news anchor, Marvia Malik, onto their screens in March.

Malik said that she was “overwhelmed” by the support she received after her TV debut.

(Kohenoor News)

However, there is growing concern over the government’s response to violence directed at the trans community.

In the last month alone, a trans woman named Chutki was killed while travelling in an auto-rickshaw in Peshawar, and another trans woman, Chitrali, was stabbed when she resisted a kidnapping attempt.

Related topics: Asia, Asia, Crime, murder, Pakistan, Pakistan, Transgender, transphobia

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