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Mexico has more gay rights than the US, say experts

Jasmine Andersson May 3, 2018

US President Donald Trump (C) waves next to Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto (R) ahead of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit leaders gala dinner in the central Vietnamese city of Danang on November 10, 2017.

Mexico has a stronger record on LGBT+ rights than the US, say leading academics.

Although the US may boast a more vocal stance on supporting LGBT+ rights, leading experts say that the machismo culture found in the nation is negated by the wide separation between church and state.

“Common stereotypes of Mexico’s macho culture might lead us to expect that the legal landscape for gay rights in Mexico would be far less egalitarian than in the United States,” Caroline Beer and Victor Cruz Aceves wrote in a piece for LSE.

“Yet there is no explicit constitutional protection for sexual orientation in the United States.”

While Mexico decriminalised homosexuality in 1871, the US Supreme Court overturned anti-sodomy laws in 2003,.

And although Mexico is a more religious nation, a national anti-discrimination law that included sexual orientation as a protected category was able to be carried out because of the distinction between church and state, says the report.

However, the researchers say that opportunities for individuals to carry out unauthorised acts of violence is a risk in the country.

More than 200 LGBT people have been killed in Mexico in just three years.

 

A member of the transgender community demonstrates during a protest in front of the Secretary of Interior building in Mexico City on October 20, 2016. (YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty)

“We should emphasis that, in many ways the rule of law has not been effectively implemented in Mexico, and agents of the state use violence in ways that are not authorised by the law,” the experts wrote.

“Individual state actors have used state violence against sexual minorities, often with impunity. While the law is not always effectively enforced in Mexico, the law does not allow for legal discrimination of sexual minorities.”

Since President Donald Trump’s government voted to scrap Title IX protections, which protected the constitutional rights of trans pupils attending school, as well as banning transgender people from joining the military, LGBT+ people are seeing an erosion of their rights in the country.

 

NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 23: Activists and members of the transgender community gathered outside the historic LGTB bar to denounce the new policy. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
(Getty)

In 2017, advocates tracked at least 28 deaths of transgender people in the United States due to fatal violence, the most ever recorded, reports the Human Rights Campaign.

61 percent of Mexicans think that society should accept homosexuality, while 60 percent of Americans believe this should be the case.

Mexico has banned gay conversion therapy, while gay conversion therapy is still legal in 41 states in the US.

The countries have been at odds ever since Trump announced that he wanted to build a wall between the States and Mexico during his presidential campaign in January 2015.

 

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 27: U.S. President Donald Trump listens during a joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the East Room of the White House April 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump held talks and a working lunch with Chancellor Merkel prior to the joint news conference. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
(Alex Wong/Getty)

The “impenetrable, physical, tall, powerful, beautiful, southern border wall” will cost at least $10 billion to construct, according to estimates.

This is in spite of the fact that current border patrol costs are setting the government back $160 million — or $6,271 for each person caught, reported The Washington Post.

More: Americas, Donald Trump, Enrique Pena Nieto, Gay rights, LGBT rights, LSE, Mexico, Mexico, US, US

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