Menu

InstagramTwitterYouTubeFacebookSnapchat
Globe Icon
Entertainment

Broad City star Abbi Jacobson comes out: ‘I go both ways’

Nick Duffy April 9, 2018

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 14: Actor, comedian, writer Abbi Jacobson (known for "Broad City") attends Worldwide Orphans 12th Annual Gala at Cipriani Wall Street on November 14, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for WWO)

Abbi Jacobson, the star of comedy series Broad City, has come out.

The comedy creator came out while promoting 6 Balloons, her new Netflix film with Dave Franco.

Speaking to Vanity Fair, she was asked about her own love life.

Abbi Jacobson attends the “6 Balloons” red carpet premiere during SXSW 2018 (Daniel Boczarski/Getty Images for Netflix)

Jacobson said she is single, telling the outlet: “I kind of go both ways; I date men and women. They have to be funny, doing something they love.

“I don’t know—I’ve never really been interviewed about this before.”

Of potential suitors coming forward, she joked: “Yeah, who knows? The world is my oyster.”

Fans welcomed the actor’s news.

Actress Abbi Jacobson on stage at The Paley Center For Media’s 32nd Annual PALEYFEST LA (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Her Comedy Central series Broad City previously attracted attention for censoring every mention of Donald Trump‘s name.

However, the gag may not stick around for the upcoming second season.

Jacobson said: “We had this whole discussion, and I think we are actually trying to avoid even mentioning him. It’s not even funny anymore.”

Abbi Jacobson attends Vulture Festival Comedy Night at The Bell House on May 11, 2014 in New York City (Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images for New York Magazine)

Speaking about the decision previously, the show’s co-creator Ilana Glazer said: “We just got to a point where… in real life, we’re talking about the current administration. We’re talking about Trump, and it sounds so gross, like, every day, saying it so many times.

“We just didn’t want to share airtime. He’s got enough.

Jacobson added: “We are censored in certain ways on the show, and it ends up being a big part of our job in the later part of production, in the edit, where it’s what can we show, what can we say, pixels, all these S&P (Standards and Practices) notes and things like that.

“And there are all these different levels of jokes, and I think it was actually something we came up with in the end of writing.”

More: Broad City, Gay, LGBT, Television, US

Click to comment

Swipe sideways to view more posts!

Dismiss

Loading ...

Close icon