The Australian version of The Spectator magazine has sparked outrage by comparing same-sex marriage to marrying the devil.

Earlier this week, it was revealed that Australia had voted overwhelmingly in favour of legalising same-sex marriage, by a margin of 62% to 38%.



The reactions were full of joy, relief and love, as a nation celebrated a positive decision after months of homophobia and divisive campaigning.

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But not everyone has taken the news well.

In a move which you could say makes them sore losers, The Spectator’s next cover will feature Adam, arm wrapped around Satan, telling Eve: “We’ve got something to tell you”.

Just to drive the point home – that homosexual unions are akin to marrying the literal embodiment of sin – Satan is offering a wedding ring to Adam as the snake watches.

(The Spectator Australia)

Half-eaten apples – from the Tree of Knowledge, naturally – are also strewn on the floor, to emphasise how much the cover wants you to see gay sex as unholy.

In an article with the headline “Yessssssss” (get it? Like a snake), the publication defended its decision to create such a hateful cover page.

“The devil is in the detail. And the snakes are in the grass,” it starts.

This is seemingly part of the magazine’s attempt to portray LGBT people and their supporters as snakes.

Australians celebrated the Yes vote immediately after it was announced.
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Later in the piece, for instance, the magazine states: “Conservatives have been betrayed. The snakes in the grass are laughing.”

It alleges that the cover “accurately reflects the outcome of the same-sex marriage survey, highlighting the religious and cultural threats now unleashed.”

The editorial continues: “Our congratulations to the Yes campaign, although we did strongly support the No case,” but this apparent graciousness is short-lived.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 15: Rebecca Davies and her partner Paula Van Bruggen kiss as they celebrate in the crowd as the result is announced during the Official Melbourne Postal Survey Result Announcement at the State Library of Victoria on November 15, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. Australians have voted for marriage laws to be changed to allow same-sex marriage, with the Yes vote defeating No. Despite the Yes victory, the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey is not binding, and the process to change current laws will move to the Australian Parliament in Canberra. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
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It voices support for Senator James Paterson, the right-wing politician who planned to introduce a bill that would override anti-discrimination laws passed by state and territory level legislatures.

He has pulled this bill, choosing instead to attempt to negotiate amendments which he hopes will be added to the final same-sex marriage legislation.

As well as praising a lawmaker trying to ensure that discrimination is legal, The Spectator also uses a strange phrase in doing so.

“Hats off to Senator James Paterson, too, for his belated attempt to put a finger in the dyke of SSM euphoria,” it writes.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 15:  People in the crowd celebrate as the result is announced during the Official Melbourne Postal Survey Result Announcement at the State Library of Victoria on November 15, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. Australians have voted for marriage laws to be changed to allow same-sex marriage, with the Yes vote defeating No. Despite the Yes victory, the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey is not binding, and the process to change current laws will move to the Australian Parliament in Canberra.  (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
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The Spectator adds, in its scaremongering way, that the postal vote results might lead to people – shock horror – accepting the existence of gay people in their society.

“In the new paradigm, as this magazine has repeatedly warned, homosexuality is now normal,” it says.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 15:  Crowds supporting the Same Sex Marriage Survey listen to politicians and advocates at Taylor Square in the heart of Sydney's gay precinct on November 15, 2017 in Sydney, Australia. Australians have voted for marriage laws to be changed to allow same-sex marriage, with the Yes vote claiming 61.6% to to 38.4% for No vote. Despite the Yes victory, the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey is not binding, and the process to change current laws will move to the Australian Parliament in Canberra.  (Photo by James Alcock/Getty Images)
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The article adds that “criticism or dissent from the homosexual agenda is viewed as discriminatory and wrong.”

That’s right, “the homosexual agenda”.

It then warns that “should your school or a teacher decide to ‘educate’ your young child, or your teenager, about the joys and ways of homosexual couplings and ‘encourage’ them to ‘identify with’ such practices themselves, you as a parent or grand-parent will no longer have the legal right to object in any shape or form.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 15:  People in the crowd celebrate as the result is announced during the Official Melbourne Postal Survey Result Announcement at the State Library of Victoria on November 15, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. Australians have voted for marriage laws to be changed to allow same-sex marriage, with the Yes vote defeating No. Despite the Yes victory, the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey is not binding, and the process to change current laws will move to the Australian Parliament in Canberra.  (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
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“Welcome to our brave new world,” it adds, with all the sardonic wit of a stereotypical teenager.

The idea of LGBT-inclusive education is “cowardly and deceptive,” it adds.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 15:  People in the crowd celebrate as the result is announced during the Official Melbourne Postal Survey Result Announcement at the State Library of Victoria on November 15, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. Australians have voted for marriage laws to be changed to allow same-sex marriage, with the Yes vote defeating No. Despite the Yes victory, the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey is not binding, and the process to change current laws will move to the Australian Parliament in Canberra.  (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
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Some people just don’t realise when they’re on the wrong side of history.

People were not thrilled with the cover, safe to say.

One wrote: “Well that is disgraceful.

“Honestly lost for words.”

(Twitter/libllama)

Another said they were “glad to find the upside down version is as shit as the real spectator 👌”.

(Twitter/Judoon_Platoon)

One remarked sarcastically: “Lacking wit and intelligence.

“Well done!”

(Twitter/mickkime)

“Anachronism isn’t a strong enough word,” commented another.

(Twitter/wmdivision)

Other reactions from No campaign supporters have been equally bizarre.

Kevin Andrews, a hardline No campaigner and backbench politician, appeared on Sky News Australia to declare that Jewish bakers should now be allowed to discriminate against Islamic customers in a bizarre rant.

“I don’t have a problem if there’s a gay baker who says they don’t want to bake a cake for a heterosexual wedding, or for a Christian or an Islamic celebration or whatever it might be,” said Andrews.

“So a Jewish baker should be able to deny an Islamic…?” asked Sky News host David Speers.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 15:  Crowds supporting the Same Sex Marriage Survey listen to politicians and advocates at Taylor Square in the heart of Sydney's gay precinct on November 15, 2017 in Sydney, Australia. Australians have voted for marriage laws to be changed to allow same-sex marriage, with the Yes vote claiming 61.6% to to 38.4% for No vote. Despite the Yes victory, the outcome of Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey is not binding, and the process to change current laws will move to the Australian Parliament in Canberra.
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“Why not?” Andrews responded.

“It has to be in relation to marriage. We’re not talking about someone comes in and says ‘David Speers I want to buy a cake’ — well of course there shouldn’t be objection to that, but this goes to fundamental religious beliefs and beliefs of conscience, and it’s only in relation to that.”

No voter and former Prime Minister Tony Abbott said “parliament should respect the result”.

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But he added: “I also thank the 4.7 million Australians who supported marriage between a man and a woman.”

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - OCTOBER 01:  Thousands of people gather in support of same sex mariage on October 1, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. Australians are currently taking part in the Marriage Law Postal Survey, which is asking whether the law should be changed to allow same-sex marriage. The outcome of the survey is expected to be announced on 15 November.  (Photo by Darrian Traynor/Getty Images)
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He also suggested he wanted the proposed bill amending.

“I look forward to a parliamentary process that improves on the Dean Smith bill to implement same sex marriage with freedom of conscience for all, not just the churches,” he said.

Meanwhile Australian Conservatives leader Cory Bernardi claimed: “A great many more Australians have concerns about the consequences for our cherished freedoms, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of conscience.”

He later posted a video to YouTube claiming same-sex marriage damaged the “structures which have built Western civilisation”.

The public vote is not legally binding, so both houses still need to pass legislation for it to become legal.

And the Australian government has said that Parliament will sit for “as long as it takes” to pass an equal marriage bill.




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