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‘Bomb’ that disrupted Brighton Pride was actually a pinhole camera

Nick Duffy August 7, 2015
A giant rainbow flag being carried along Brighton seaside

A giant rainbow Pride flag is carried along the sea front during Brighton Pride 2018. (Tristan Fewings/Getty)

A suspicious package that led police to close off a street and divert Brighton Pride parade was actually just a pinhole camera.

Brighton’s Pride parade was delayed last weekend after explosives officers were called to deal with a ‘suspicious package’ on the city’s seafront, just a few yards away from where the parade was set to leave.

The parade was originally meant to set off at 11am, but was delayed by police until 12.30pm – taking a diversion from its original route to avoid the area.

Police claimed on the day that the package was a “bomb hoax” – but after an investigation they have now admitted they were actually just dealing with a pinhole camera.

A pinhole camera is an often-homemade device which can be used to capture images very slowly, and are used to take photos of objects or landscapes over an extended period of time.

Detective Inspector Julie Wakeford said the ‘package’ and two others found in the city since 2013 were not intended to cause harm.

She said: “We have linked all three items as pinhole cameras. No offences have been committed on this occasion as there was no deliberate intent to disrupt or cause harm and we do not believe that the person responsible considered the implications of placing that item at that location.

“It is reassuring to know that there was no intention of targeting Pride or any particular community.

“However if it important that permission is given and recorded if such items are to be placed on public or on another person’s property. Failure to do this may mean that an individual does commit an offence of public nuisance or criminal damage.

She added: “The item on Saturday did look like a suspicious device and we were concerned enough to call in the bomb disposal unit, who after making a further assessment, also agreed it was highly suspicious and carried out a controlled explosion.

“The area had been cordoned off and there was no risk to the public.”

 

More: bomb, Brighton, brighton pride, camera, England, Gay, hoax, LGBT, pinhole camera, police, Pride

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