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Texan mother shuts down homophobes who want to ban pro-gay library books

Megan Boyanton July 17, 2015

A proud mother in Texas has stepped up to defend her local library – amid an attempt to ban pro-gay children’s books.

Earlier this month, more than 50 upset parents in Hood County attempted to rid the children’s section of My Princess Boy and This Day in June because of their supposedly “inappropriate” subject matter.

When the Hood County Library Advisory Board decided to keep the books, locals brought the fight to the Hood County Commissioners’ Court.

In front of the officials and the packed audience, a 45-year-old Texan mother delivered a powerful speech at the public hearing, saying: “I am a tax-payer here and my rights as a tax-payer in this county count for just as much as anybody else’s rights in this county.

“And I want the books there. And the reason I want the books there is because I have two boys.

“One boy is just about as straight as they come. He drives a pick-up truck. He’s got girls from here and there. . .

“My other son is engaged to be married and is gay as the day is long.

“And he was my princess boy. . . and he still is.

“He came in at five years old. . . He walked around with the Mardi Gras beads and, then, he went and got my big straw hat that I like to garden in. . .

“And he said, ‘Momma, don’t I look pretty?’ And I said, ‘You bet you do.’

“Because he was my princess boy and I’m proud of him. . .

“He stands with this community and this library, as do I. . .

“We’re in Commissioner’s Court, not church. And, although I am a Christian. . . that’s not what this is about.

“This is about rendering under Caesar what is Caesar’s and rendering under God what is God’s and, ladies and gentlemen, we are in court in county and this is Caesar’s. . .

“When your child at four-years-old picks up a book that they probably couldn’t read and says, ‘Momma, I don’t understand this,’ let me tell you how I answer that.

“‘Well, honey, some of us live differently than others.’ And, then, we move on.”

While several citizens spoke against the books, the support for keeping My Princess Boy and This Day in June was blatantly represented.

The American Library Association, along with the National Coalition Against Censorship, sent separate letters to the Commissioners’ Court in favour of the literature.

Local reporter Stella Chavez live-tweeted the hearing, highlighting comments backing the books.

While the community is known for being both rural and conservative, many points were brought up about permitting the books to prevent censorship.

Bringing the LGBT community into the picture, Hood County Library Director Courtney Kincaid said, according to the Texas Observer: “We do have gays and lesbians in the community, and they have every right to have items in the collection.”

Additionally, comments were made about keeping religion and public resources, like the county library, separate.

Another speaker, who enters the video at 9:59, speaks on behalf of Ms Kincaid and her own newborn daughter, saying: “I will teach my daughter tolerance. I will teach my daughter inclusion.

“I will give her the tools to self-censor.

“I do not believe that religious beliefs should block anything that she should learn. . .

“And, with the issues of LGBT matters- in comparison to The Bible- we’re talking about a gay pride parade and a boy in a dress.

“Not incest, not rape, not murder, not polygamy, not inequality for women, not slavery- we’re talking about a boy in a dress.”

Arguments against the library’s decision included many religious references.

It’s noted that Texas Senator Brian Birdwell’s wife, Mel Birdwell, led the fight against the books.

Freelance writer John Savage also took to Twitter to document the hearing, which he reported as hours long.

Parents wanted to preserve the innocence of their children and keep them from being exposed to the LGBT community.

Protesters even stood outside of the building before the forum, holding signs with anti-LGBT slogans, such as, “Don’t brainwash children.”

Coincidentally, in September, the Hood County Library had a display for Banned Books Week, which included many on the list for religious reasons.

One read, “I am banned by Catholic leaders,” and another said, “I am banned because a school board in Kentucky viewed me as anti-Christian.”

All was in vain, however, as the court ruled for the library to keep My Princess Boy and This Day in June.

They recommended that, if residents were still unhappy, they should apply to join the library advisory board.

More: Anti-gay, censorship, coming out, Discrimination, Gay, Homophobia, homophobic, hood county, lesbian, LGBT, LGBT rights, my princess day, Texas, this day in june, Trans, US

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