Current Affairs

Lithuanian army refuses gays – by asking recruits if they like flowers

Naith Payton June 17, 2015
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After Lithuania re-introduced mandatory services, conscripts are being asked questions to determine their sexuality.

The randomly-selected men  have to complete a psychological test to asses their suitability. According to the Lithuania Tribune, questions include asking if they like flowers or have ever considered becoming florist.

They are also asked if they have ever wanted to be a woman.

Psychiatrist Kęstutis Ramanauskas was asked if this was intended to determine sexuality. He said: “You hit the bullseye. I use it as a criteria to screen them out.

“Even though it is claimed that it is not a disease, but it is. Wrong orientation is a psycho-behavioural disorder. Even though some disagree.

“But a person like that will be bullied in the army, he will not be able to serve out the nine-month term.”

The Lithuanian Minister of Defence, however, said: “Our laws and decrees do not include any discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation.

“The army is open to both heterosexual and homosexual individuals, we do not reject troops fit to serve in Lithuania’s Armed Forces by the principle.”

Lithuania caused a stir at the Eurovision Song Contest this year, with dancers kissing their same-sex partners.

The Lithuanian Prime Minister recently rebuked musician Ten Walls for comparing gay people to paedophiles. 

Related topics: Army, conscription, Employment, Europe, Lithuania, miltary

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