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Everyone should hear this moving Oscars speech about teen suicide

Joseph McCormick February 23, 2015
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On accepting an Oscar, the screenwriter of ‘The Imitation Game’ has revealed that he tried to kill himself as a teenager, but urged others to accept their weirdness and not to do the same.

Graham Moore, in accepting the honour for Best Adapted Screenplay for the Alan Turing biopic ‘The Imitation Game’ at the 87th Academy Awards, said he tried to kill himself when he was a teenager because he “felt different”.

Moore went on to movingly give reassurance to those who feel like they don’t fit in to persevere, and to embrace diversity rather than harm themselves.

“When I was 16 years old, I tried to kill myself because I felt weird and I felt different and I felt like I did not belong,” Moore said.

“And now I’m standing here, and so I would like this moment to be for that kid out there who feels like she’s weird or she’s different or she doesn’t fit in anywhere. Yes, you do. I promise you do. Stay weird. Stay different, and then when it’s your turn and you are standing on this stage, please pass this same message to the next person who comes along.”

Watch the speech below

The Imitation Game, which has been critically acclaimed, but criticised by some who suggested that it attempted to downplay Turing’s homosexuality, was nominated for eight Oscars, but Moore picked up the only one.

The film was a surprise flop at the BAFTAs last month. The film failed to pick up a single gong despite nine nominations, and being considered a frontrunner.

The film also managed to not win a single prize at the Golden Globes, despite five nominations.

Turing’s biographer Andrew Hodges previously said he was “alarmed by the inaccuracies” in the film, adding: “They have built up the relationship with Joan much more than it actually was. Their relationship is invented.”

Sherlock star Benedict Cumberbatch claimed there was no need for gay sex in the film, saying: “If you need to see that to understand that he’s gay, then all is lost for any kind of subtle storytelling. It’s not something that needed to be made obvious.”

If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this article and need to talk to someone, visit samaritans.org or call 08457 90 90 90.

Related topics: academy awards, Graham Moore, Oscars, suicide, The Imitation Game, US

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