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Film Reviews

  • 18th January 2008

    Lust, Caution

    12:20 AM — Taiwanese director Ang Lee is nothing if not eclectic in his output. Still best known for 2000's beautifully-shot epic martial arts flick Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon - which in turn helped bring us the sumptuous likes of Zhang Yimou's decidedly similar Hero and House of Flying Daggers - it is easy to forget just how odd a bunch of movies he's been associated with. After all, his back catalogue includes everything from New York-set immigration comedy The Wedding Banquet to Taiwan-set romance Eat Drink Man Woman to lush Kate Winslet-starring Austen adaptation Sense and Sensibility, through philosophical superhero flick Hulk, suburban character study The Ice Storm, American Civil War romance Ride With The Devil, and his most recent, the film indelibly dubbed "that gay cowboy flick", Brokeback Mountain.

  • P.S. I Love You

    12:20 AM — The sheer unpleasantness of the thought that, one day, we are all bound to die has naturally led to human beings creating various methods to avoid worrying about the inevitable. Religion is, of course, the most obvious - but comedy comes a close second.Taking the micky out of death has a long history, making light of our inevitable demise largely to - bizarrely, if you think about it - help us all stop, well, thinking about it.

  • Charlie Wilson’s War

    12:20 AM — Every now and then, a film comes along that has Oscar written all over it. If you were to look at CVs of those involved in Charlie Wilson's War, you'd know that putting money on this little outfit to pick up a slew of golden men in a couple of months' time is likely to be one of the safest bets you've ever made.Top of the bill, as the titular Charlie Wilson, is none other than Tom Hanks - the Academy's favourite star for well over a decade now, with two Oscars and another three nominations under his belt.

  • Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead

    12:20 AM — Veteran director Sidney Lumet, best known for the Al Pacino-starring 1970s classics Serpico and Dog Day Afternoon, has had a rather hit-and-miss time of it in his six decades-long career. Starting out at the dawn of the television era, he made his impressive feature film directorial debut - gaining himself the first of five Oscar nominations in the process - in 1957's superb courtroom drama 12 Angry Men, before going on to helm the varied but much-loved likes of Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962), Fail-Safe (1964), Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and Network (1976). Then he fell into a bit of a rut in the 1980s and 90s.

  • Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem

    12:20 AM — A sequel to a dire action/horror movie - especially one based on a computer game - is normally cause to flee for the hills. Ever since the Bob Hoskins-starring Super Mario Brothers nearly killed the careers of all involved way back in 1993, computer game movies have had a truly abysmal history.Remember the Jean Claude Van Damme vehicle Street Fighter? The tedious attempt to do justice to the classic game Doom?

  • No Country For Old Men

    12:20 AM — Everyone loves the Coen Brothers, surely? Over the last two decades, the oddball pair have produced some of the weirdest and most wonderful movies ever to have come out of America - quirky yet accessible, and always with a streak of deliciously black humour running throughout.The Coens have given us that modern icon, Jeff Bridges' White Russian-supping bowling layabout The Dude in their biggest hit, The Big Lebowski.

  • 26th October 2007

    Elizabeth: The Golden Age

    5:10 PM — 1997's Elizabeth, dealing with the early years of Queen Elizabeth I and her difficult passage to the throne, was a glorious example of the most lavish kind of period drama. Plush sets, a big-name cast, incredible costumes, and a central performance from a then-nearly unknown Cate Blanchett, who was robbed of an Oscar - Best Actress that year instead went to Gwyneth Paltrow for her turn in the so-so Elizabethan romantic comedy Shakespeare in Love, prompting a memorable bout of acceptance speech hysterics.

  • Lions for Lambs 1

    5:10 PM — Say what you like about Tom Cruise, he certainly knows how to pick his films. He may well have had a falling out with Paramount after his bizarre, Scientology and love-inspired behaviour in the run-up to his wedding last year, but love him or loathe him he's one of the most bankable stars in Hollywood - and you don't get to that level of fame by appearing in bad films. Unless, of course, they're bad films that are likely to make a huge amount of money - like Days of Thunder, Legend or the last couple of Mission: Impossible movies.

  • Beowulf

    5:10 PM — In the wake of the massive success of The Lord of the Rings, little wonder that Hollywood's been scrabbling around for other fantasy epics to bring to the big screen, now that the technology is finally good enough to create the kind of strange creatures with which such legendary settings abound. 2005's adaptation of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe - and its forthcoming sequel Prince Caspian - was an obvious choice, so similar are the two books, thanks to their authors' friendship.

  • American Gangster 1

    5:10 PM — OK, so the last team-up between director Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe, last year's film adaptation of A Year in Provence that was A Good Year, may have been critically panned and largely ignored by cinemagoers.Yes, Scott's outing before that, 2005's historical epic Kingdom of Heaven, was likewise slated and shunned. And yes, his film before that, the Nic Cage-starring Matchstick Men, made little real impact.

  • Sleuth

    5:10 PM — What is it with doing remakes of classic Michael Caine films? Haven't they learned by now? We've had the glossy but utterly facile Jude Law-starring remake of Alfie, which singularly managed to remove any of the easy cool and charm from that wonderfully misogynistic character, and ripped out the deep sense of melancholy at the heart of the original film in the process. We've had the truly abysmal, almost sacrilegious remake of the glorious Get Carter, with Sylvester Stallone making Caine's cold-heartedly distraught mob killer on a revenge trip into an overweight and pathetically mumbling joke.

  • The Darjeeling Limited

    5:10 PM — The fifth film by oddball director Wes Anderson - he of The Royal Tenenbaums and The Life Aquatic fame - was always going to be much anticipated.Anderson's films have a wonderful tendency to be both decidedly quirky and gloriously affecting comic character studies quite unlike anything being churned out by anyone else in the Hollywood mainstream.

  • The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford

    5:10 PM — One of the most anticipated films of the autumn, The Assassination of Jesse James has nonetheless been a long time in coming - nearly as long as its title, in fact.Originally set for a 2006 release, with filming completed more than two years ago, despite rave reviews from test screenings for the central performances of Brad Pitt (as James) and Ben's little brother Casey Affleck (as Ford), the fact that the film is a Western seems to have given the studio a number of concerns.

  • Fred Claus

    5:10 PM — One of the major benefits of the spread of the internet and the boom in movie piracy has been that the big American studios have finally begun to release their films world-wide at approximately the same time. Whereas in the bad old days us poor consumers from the UK market would end up getting Christmas movies in February or March, the studios following their old pattern of staggering European releases until a good three months after the American box office had had its fill, or even have to wait until the following Christmas, those nasty pirates have forced the studios' hands.

  • 29th September 2007

    Sicko

    9:30 AM — Michael Moore's stock has fluctuated wildly over the last six or so years. Where in the late 1990s he held a modest reputation as a documentary filmmaker, in the UK he was barely known.After all, his breakthrough documentary Roger Me - a 1989 investigation into the impact of outsourcing jobs to foreign countries in his hometown of Flint, Michigan - seemed to be looking at problems far less serious than those facing people in post-Miners' Strike Britain on the eve of the Poll Tax Riots.

  • The Lookout

    9:30 AM — The directorial debut of screenwriter Scott Frank, unsurprisingly also the writer of this intriguing thriller, is something that fans of intelligently constructed films should be anticipating with relish.Best known in Hollywood as a script doctor, working on films as diverse as Minority Report and The Interpreter, it is for two solo screenplays based on Elmore Leonard novels for which film buffs should thank him.

  • The Kingdom

    9:30 AM — Thanks to the generally pro-Britain approach of the United States in the early years of the Second World War, Hollywood began producing movies about the war long before America even entered the conflict - all staunchly pro-Allies.It wasn't until the mid 1960s that any Second World War films began to emerge that were even vaguely critical of any Allied soldiers, or that dared to suggest that, well, maybe it wasn't quite as simple as "all Germans and Japanese are evil" as the movies seemed to make out.

  • The Heartbreak Kid

    9:30 AM — In the late 1990s, it looked as if the Farrelly brothers were the next big thing in Hollywood comedy. First came the bizarrely braindead Dumb and Dumber then the more intelligent yet equally weird Kingpin, both of which made decent amounts of money and built up keen fanbases that adore them to this day.But the real clincher was 1998's There's Something About Mary - one of the most influential comedies of the decade.

  • The Invasion

    9:30 AM — In today's world of increasing paranoia over the creeping powers of state surveillance, where parallels to Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and the Red Scares of the 1950s are made in the West's liberal press on an almost daily basis, it seems a fairly obvious choice to look to old Cold War parables for sources to rework for the present day.But in hunting them out, it seems rather bizarre to opt for one of those that helped add to the paranoia, rather than point out the insanity of the situation.

  • Ratatouille

    9:30 AM — Despite the vast majority of modern computer-animated children's films revolving around talking animals being derivative and uninspired, with even the latest Shrek movie having lost much of the lustre that made its predecessors so much fun, every now and then the genre still throws up the odd gem.With the behind-the-scenes talent involved in this latest outing from animation giants Disney and Pixar - notably writer and co-director Brad Bird, the chap behind the entertaining The Incredibles and superb The Iron Giant - the signs were always good.

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