Enter your email address to receive our daily LGBT news roundup

You're free to unsubscribe at any time.

Author photoSteve Leng

  • 19th November 2007

    Banning Gay Pride march was illegal, Supreme Court rules

    Riga City Council appealed a decision earlier this year by the Administrative Court that the ban was unlawful, but the Supreme Court has now confirmed the ruling.

    6:15 PM — Latvian authorities have ruled that a ban on a Gay Pride march in 2006 was illegal.The event was was banned amid threats of violence from extremist groups.The municipal authorities in the Latvian capital Riga were told that the event would be cancelled to avoid public disorder after Christians, nationalists and neo-Nazis threatened the parade with violence and a counter march.

  • Number of AIDS cases lower than previously estimated

    Much of the global drop in AIDS cases is due to revised estimates from India, which this year slashed its numbers in half, from about six million cases to about three million, and to new data from countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

    6:15 PM — Global numbers of people with AIDS may have been over exaggerated, according to news reports.The number in 2006, estimated to be 40 million people, may have been 6.2 million over the real amount.The decline is largely just on paper -- the new numbers are the result of improved methodology, which shows the spread of AIDS has been losing momentum for almost a decade.

  • Gay hate crime on the rise in US 1

    The numbers are thought to be higher than reported however, due to only 12,600 of the US's 17,000 local, county, state and federal police agencies participating in the report.

    6:15 PM — Hate crime incidents in the US rose by nearly 8 per cent last year, according to an FBI report.There were 7,722 reported cases targeting victims or their property as a result of bias against sexual orientation, race, religion,national origin or physical or mental disability.The numbers are thought to be higher than reported however, due to only 12,600 of the US's 17,000 local, county, state and federal police agencies participating in the report.

  • Fire service plans to improve gay representation

    The government is seeking the views of the fire and rescue service, its partners and employees.

    5:35 PM — A framework document on the future of the fire and rescue service is set to include plans to improve the representation of the LGB community.Currently less than 0.5% of the fire service are openly lesbian, gay or bixexual, equivalent to less than 270 people. Nationwide, 7% of the working population identify themselves as LGB.The document, to be released in spring 2008, also addresses the representation of women and minority background employees, which the fire service lacks in current trends.

  • Korea urged to reinstate orientation discrimination proposals

    Hahn Chae Yoon, director of the Alliance, has claimed the move was due to an upcoming presidential election.

    4:50 PM — Plans to drop sexual orientation from a proposed bill on anti-discrimination in South Korea have been met with disappointment from LGBT organisations all over the world.The bill, the first of its kind in the country was announced in October.According to news reports and members from the ruling Democratic Labour Party, sexual orientation has since been removed from the draft along with other categories such as ideologies, appearance and military status.

  • C4 cleared over Muslim gay-hate documentary 9

    Today Ofcom ruled that Undercover Mosque had not misled viewers or offended Muslims.

    12:35 PM — The broadcasting watchdog has cleared Channel 4 over a documentary broadcast in January exposing homophobic preaching in UK mosques.The Dispatches programme portrayed a Birmingham mosque as a haven for extreme views.Today Ofcom ruled that Undercover Mosque had not misled viewers or offended Muslims. Undercover footage showed preacher Abu Usamah at Green Lane Mosque in Birmingham calling for gay people to be executed.

Latest stories

See all