The Labour leader says there needs to be increased representation in UK Parliament.

Jeremy Corbyn has said he has “some sympathy” for some groups who feel they are not represented in UK politics.

The Labour leader says he recognises the need for all-LGBT shortlists, suggesting it could increase the representation of minority groups in Parliament.

Mr Corbyn – who recently sat down with PinkNews – said Parliament had a duty to represent “the totality of our society”, adding that he has “some sympathy” for adding all-LGBT, all-black and all-disabled shortlists.

The leader of the opposition made the claims after questions on why exclusive shortlists for such groups did not already exist.

“There have been ideas that that should be put forward,” he said.

“I have some sympathy with that, actually, and for ensuring there is a place on selection processes for people representing LGBT, Black, and disabled communities.

“Parliament at the end of the day has to be representative of the totality of our society, and it’s up to all of us, recognising that we’re ins a party political system, that our parties operate in a way that all those groups do end up with representation.”

He added that he thinks parliament “can deliver it without breaching the equality act by requiring them to be included in a shortlisting process.”

Mr Corbyn said all-women shortlists were initially thought of as “extremist” by opponents – but have become the most successful way of increasing women’s representation in Parliament.

“I was accused of being a far-left extremist for promoting ideas like that – can you imagine such a thing?”

Mr Corbyn’s comments come following a damning report claiming the Labour must do more for it’s LGBT members.

A recent report from the Fabian Society found LGBT politicians in the Labour party struggle to reach top positions.

There are currently 14 openly gay, lesbian or bisexual people Labour MPs – about 6%.