Popular lesbian blog AfterEllen is closing down after more than a decade.

It was announced today that the hub for lesbian news and culture published by Evolve Media, will be shutting down this week.

AfterEllen first launched in 2002, named after Ellen DeGeneres, and has overseen a boom in LBT culture.

The site’s Editor-in-Chief Trish Bendix confirmed the news on her own Tumblr, lamenting the loss of a specific hub for queer women.

Bendix wrote: “Here are the facts: Evolve Media purchased AfterEllen from Viacom two years ago.

“They gave us two fiscal years to become their LGBT property and profit in that space, and they found we are not as profitable as moms and fashion.

“And, yes, ‘they’ are mainly white heterosexual men, which is important to note because not only is this the story for us, but for a lot of other properties—large-scale media outlets, lesbian bars out-priced by neighborhoods they helped establish, housing in queer meccas like Portland that is being turned into condos and AirBnBs.

“At the very same time, queer women and culture is being celebrated on the Emmys, in the legalisation of both mothers being included on their newborn’s birth certificate, and our namesake, Ellen DeGeneres, being one of the most well-known, well-liked and undeniably profitable television and lifestyle personalities of our generation.”

She added: “Evolve has decided to keep the site and its archives alive for now, with a promise of periodically publishing freelance pieces in the future.

“I am not sure what that will look like, as Friday is also my last day, after 10 years of contributing writing and eventually coming on to work full time as a blog editor, then managing editor, and, for the last two years, as Editor in Chief.

“I feel so grateful and so, so lucky to have been a representative for lesbian and bi women for a decade. I often joke that I’m the one asking ‘the lesbian questions’ in a room full of journalists or reporters or critics that aren’t looking for the answers that I am, that we as a community deserve.

“And even though mainstream visibility has grown and larger publications have verticals now where they focus some of their attentions on LGBTs, AfterEllen was still the one place completely dedicated to queer women in media, entertainment, pop culture and our depictions therein.

“We are frequently cited, linked to, asked for comment and utilised as a resource for those who find us to be the only place that has, for so long, been the authority on ourselves.”

She added: “So what now? I can only hope that Evolve will continue to keep the site alive for the AE archives as promised for as long as the internet exists.

“There are so many stories that only exist on our site that could never be replicated elsewhere; the hard work and voices of so many queer women.

“As for me, I’ve been working on a novel for the past three years I’m hoping to find a publisher for as well as non-fiction book that is very closely related to the kinds of things you’d find on AfterEllen.

“I’ve also started to dip my toe into television writing and will continue my advocacy for LGBTs and women, no matter where I end up next.”

Despite sacking the site’s only content producers, the owners of AfterEllen claimed it was a “false rumour” that it would close.

They said: “Rest assured that you will still be able to access the site, all of its content, and communicate with others through the forums. We will continue to work with our freelancers and contributors to cover the many topics and news that are important to the LGBT community.”

However, it is unclear if any regular content will be produced.