A Republican state representative in Tennessee has laid out a plan to strip all diversity funding from a university – to buy ‘In God We Trust’ stickers for police cars.

Tennessee lawmaker James ‘Micah’ Van Huss made the proposal in House Bill 2248, filed this week.

The bill takes aim at the University of Tennessee’s office for diversity and inclusion – aiming to close down the crucial department by cutting off the funding.

What would Huss do with the money instead? He wants to put ‘In God We Trust’ on police cars.

The bill explains that it “prohibits state funds from being expended in support of the office for diversity and inclusion at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville [and] diverts such funding to a program for placing decals of the national motto on local and state law enforcement vehicles.”

Meanwhile, an amendment would ban the use of state funds “to promote the use of gender-neutral pronouns, Sex Week or to promote or demote a religious holiday” at the university.

According to the Knoxville News Sentinel, Huss insisted: “The University of Tennessee and specifically the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, in my mind and my research, has a history of repeat offenses. … Personally I don’t trust the University of Tennessee to fix the problem on their own.”

He claimed previously: “It is clear that this taxpayer-funded department in no way reflects the values of Tennesseans.

“First, it was Sex Week, then the Gender Neutral Pronouns, now these recommendations to ensure ‘holiday’ parties have nothing to do with Christmas. What else has the Office of Diversity been doing with our tax dollars?

“I am not opposed to creating an environment where students of all backgrounds can find a place. I am not opposed to funding staff to foster this kind of environment.

“However, this is NOT what the so-called Office of Diversity is doing. They are not celebrating diversity, they are wiping it out. It is the office of Political Correctness.

“Sadly, being a student with strong Judeo-Christian values, who wants to observe traditional celebrations, is no longer politically correct at UT.”