Marvel is taking extra steps to ensure gender diversity in its outfit, and has made an exciting announcement for science-loving girls.

The studio hopes that the project will attract teenagers aged 15-18, in grades 10 to 12, who are interested in science, technology, engineering or maths (STEM) subjcts.

Having teamed up with the National Academy of Sciences’ Science and Entertainment Exchange, the programme asks the teens to submit their ideas for projects which could “safeguard humanity”.

Timed to coincide with the release of Captain America: Civil War, the ‘Girls Reforming the Future Challenge’ hopes to literally save the world.

“The commitment to safeguard humanity, protect the earth at all costs and make the world a better place for future generations,” is what the project is all about, according to film star Elizabeth Olsen.

The project will see five finalists travel to California to present their inventions to a panel of experts. They will also get to attend the film’s premiere, and the grand-prize winner will win an internship at Marvel Studios.

“I’m really excited to meet these exceptional young women who have STEM backgrounds and who maybe also want to be part of more of a creative- and science-based world,” Olsen says. “And Marvel’s a perfect place for that.”

Marvel is accepting entries until 26 March, and more information is available at CaptainAmericaChallenge.com.

A new video game will give players the chance to play as canonical gay superheroes for the first time, it was announced earlier this year.

Wiccan and Hulkling – the popular gay couple and core members of the Young Avengers – are playable characters in the latest addition of Lego Marvel Avengers.

Pop star Robyn earlier this month announced the return of her Tekla festival, which will once again only be open to teenage girls, hoping to break into STEM subjects.