A politician in the US state of Kentucky has tried something pretty stupid to undermine same-sex marriage in the US.

According to a bill by State Representative Joseph M Fischer, a Republican, the definition of “matrimony” should be changed to exclude gay and lesbian couples.


A bill introduced by Fischer, which is 454 pages long, would reverse the “absolute Tyranny” created when the US Supreme Court ruled in favour of equal marriage last year.

It says: “We have full power to define marriage and to establish a new institution of matrimony in this Commonwealth.”

Put simply the bill would seek to redefine “matrimony”, as a pairing of two people of the opposite sex.

It reads: “As used and recognized in the law of the Commonwealth, ‘matrimony’ refers only to the civil status, condition, or relation of one male human being (‘husband’) and one female human being (‘wife’) united in law for life, for the discharge to each other and the community of the duties legally incumbent upon those whose association is founded on the distinction of sex.”

In case you were wondering, the bill is 454 pages long simply because, after defining a gay-free “matrimony”, it adds the term to all laws in Kentucky.

And as well as the very long bill, Fischer has introduced a short version, a separate bill, which reads: “Only a matrimony between one man and one woman shall be valid or recognized as a matrimony in Kentucky”.

Divisive Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis was jailed for contempt of court last year after repeatedly blocking same-sex weddings.

A Republican-backed law passed in the state Senate earlier this month which would create separate license forms for gay and straight couples.


The bill would strip the titles “bride/groom” from the licenses for same-sex couples – banning them from being ‘groom and groom’ or ‘bride and bride’, and instead simply stating “first party” and “second party”. Licenses issued for heterosexual couples would maintain their ‘traditional’ wording.

However, according to Kentucky Senator Morgan McGarvey, Davis passionately spoke at a clerk’s meeting on the issue – against the segregation.