An elected judge in the US state of Texas is refusing to grant same-sex marriages, claiming he spoke with God and set everything straight.

Bill Metzger, who was elected as a Republican justice of the peace in Dallas County, Texas, has posted about his decision to refuse gay weddings.

He wrote: “Because of my faith in God as a devout Catholic I will be only be conducting traditional marriages.

The Catholic justice adds that “it is not true for someone to say they are required by law to conduct a non-traditional wedding”, because the Texas Attorney General claims justices have the “religious freedom” to refuse.

Despite his ‘strongly held’ faith, the justice does not specify whether he is refusing to conduct all marriages that aren’t in line with Catholic teaching – like weddings for divorced people and couples who’ve had pre-marital sex – or if he’s simply claiming he has a ‘religious freedom’ exemption from the gays.

He added: “It is clear that any Justice of the Peace in Texas can refuse to perform a non-traditional wedding when that wedding can be performed by others.

“My sincerely held religious belief keeps me from being forced to conduct anything but a traditional wedding as a Judge per our Attorney General.”

Of course, the Texas Attorney General might think that, but the US Supreme Court probably have the more important opinion overall – and the court has consistently maintained that same-sex marriage is a constitutional right.

Given how great everything went for Kentucky clerk Kim Davis when she pulled the same schtick, Metzger’s decision has provoked a lot of anger.

One commenter wrote: “You should resign your position as a judge if you cannot do the job you are paid handsomely to do.

“If your faith means that much to you then you should not have a problem with finding work more appropriate to your mediaeval beliefs.”

A second wrote: “What you are doing is against the law and entirely unconstitutional. You need to look into why separation of church and state exist, as well.

“You are clearly incapable of perform your duties as a judge and need to resign.”