Democrats in San Francisco have opposed a bid to ban bareback porn, which is set to come to a public vote.

California voters will be asked to vote later this year on an initiative, submitted by outspoken gay activist Michael Weinstein of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, asking whether the filming of bareback porn should be banned in the state.

The initiative would make condoms mandatory in all pornographic scenes filmed in the state, for both gay and straight scenes, on the grounds bareback sex promotes ‘risky’ behaviour.

Similar plans have been strongly opposed by the adult entertainment industry and other sexual health groups in the past – based on arguments that risks are minimal as mandatory vetting and testing for actors is already in place.

Just one incident of an actor being infected with HIV on a porn set has been recorded in the past decade – while there are fears that an outright ban would simply drive the industry underground – and away from safe sex resources.

Ahead of the vote, local Democrats have come out strongly against the measure – and they want national leaders to take a stance too.

HIV-positive Democrat Matt Dorsey tabled a motion on the issue passed by the San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee, according to the Bay Area Reporter.

He told the newspaper: “These issues aren’t intuitive for a lot of people, especially when the measure is referred to as the ‘condoms in porn measure.’

“The first question I would hear from people is, ‘What is wrong with condoms?’ Well, nothing.

“t really takes some going through the measure and understanding the context and larger narrative to get how dangerous this measure is.

“In the end everyone did their homework, and I applaud my colleagues on the DCCC for it.”

However, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation continues to claim that the practise of allowing porn actors to have unprotected sex is unsafe, and that porn studios are setting a bad example on condom use.

Weinstein told the LA Times previously: “We’ve taken polls that show, statewide, 71% support.

“We’re very confident that we will be successful on election day. There is no area of employment where safety is optional.”

The group’s views are often controversial – previously attacking the use of HIV-preventing drug Truvada. Despite endorsements for the drug from the FDA and World Health Organization, AHF President Michael Weinstein labelled it a “party drug”.

LA County, which has traditionally been a haven for porn studios, passed an ordinance in November 2012 banning the filming of bareback sex.

It was subsequently revealed that applications for permits to shoot pornography in Los Angeles had fallen by 90% since the law came into effect.

Despite the huge fall in official shoots, it is likely that the regulation simply forced studios underground, pushing actors out of official screening processes and safety nets.

The California Senate shelved a similar law last year, after strong opposition from the adult entertainment industry.