Leading HIV charity the Terrence Higgins Trust (THT) has appointed a new chief executive.

Ian Green, who has worked in various leadership roles across the voluntary, health, local government, housing, and social care sectors was announced as the new CEO today.

He was “involved with” the YMCA for more than 25 years, THT announced, and was the chief executive of YMCA England.

Green’s appointment came following the interim appointment of former Trustee Jackie Morton last July.

Speaking about his new appointment, Ian Green said: “I am really excited to be joining Terrence Higgins Trust. I have long admired the wonderful work of the charity, and I am honoured to accept the post of Chief Executive.

“I look forward to working collaboratively with staff and volunteers, the Board of Trustees, and all external partners, to continue to deliver innovative HIV and sexual health services across England, Scotland and Wales, in what are undoubtedly challenging times, with cuts to health and social care budgets.”

Green previously held positions in the London Borough of Ealing as an elected Council member, Cabinet Member for Adult Social Services and Housing; and as Mayor.  He has also held a number of non-executive roles in the NHS.

For five years Ian was Chair of Ealing Hospital NHS Trust and is currently a member of the board of West Hampshire Clinical Commissioning Group –  the body responsible for commissioning health services for a population of over 500,000 – where he chairs the Clinical Governance Committee.

Robert Glick, Chair of the Board of Trustees, Terrence Higgins Trust, said: “On behalf of the entire Board, I would like to congratulate Ian on his appointment, and we look forward to his tenure beginning this coming March.

“Ian has a track record of strong leadership, and we are confident that he will ensure that Terrence Higgins Trust continues as the UK’s leading HIV and sexual health charity.

“We would also like to take this opportunity to thank Jackie Morton for her tremendous work as interim CEO of Terrence Higgins Trust. Jackie’s guidance and commitment, and the support she has shown to all staff and volunteers, has positioned to charity well for the next stage in its development.”

Green will take up his post on March 1.

Dr Rosemary Gillespie was asked to step down last year, with the board saying: “A change of leadership is needed for the next stage of the organisation’s development.”

However, Dr Gillespie said she felt she had been treated “unfairly” at the charity.

She said she did not fall out with her staff, and accused the board of “not having the stomach” to see through her changes to the charity’s structure.

Dr Gillespie added: “I was surprised and disappointed and I do not think I have been treated well.”

“I have done nothing wrong. A number of people have left since I joined, as you would expect during a significant period of change. Perhaps people should look more closely at the board’s leadership and the detrimental impact their leadership is having on people who use THT’s services.”