Enter your email address to receive our daily LGBT news roundup

You're free to unsubscribe at any time.

Comment: Why is drug use higher in the gay community?

  • Balance

    Just the other day came the good news that young people are using less alcohol and drugs. Part of the reason was lack of cash. Perhaps gay men, most of whom have no child-caring responsibilities, have more money to burn as well as time on their hands.

    But the main reason is probably the alienation that many gay men still feel: spending hours in isolation on the internet (which isn’t a substitute for knowing real people) or in nightclubs where conversation is prevented by loud music or with casual pick-ups with other alienated people. I hope people spend more time making real friendships and spend time with those of their family who are accepting.

    I think people are also too tolerant of drugs. As we want people to accept homosexuality, we feel we have to accept everything to avoid being labelled hypocrites. But it’s better to think each issue through separately. “Just say no” to drugs. Otherwise the message gets too confusing. And no more than half a pint of shandy a month and a small glass of sherry at Christmas.

    • Ben

      Another authoritarian prude, another persons drug use is none of your business anymore than another person’s sexuality is.

      • Balance

        Problem is that young people are vulnerable and gay people are vulnerable. Young gay people are very vulnerable on the gay scene (or even just in gay company). Finally relaxed and free to be themselves, they drop their defenses and common-sense. It only takes a few highs (on drugs or alcohol) to become psychologically dependent when you are in such an environment. Add in some trauma or a broken heart, and the downward spiral is almost impossible to stop, and a life of dependency for that percentage of the population (at least 25%) that becomes easily addicted to things.

        • anon

          Funny how young people on the continent, who grow up drinking alcohol socially in a family setting, don’t then go nuts and drink themselves into a coma when they go off to uni.

          • Balance

            I too wonder about this. But remember how the evil Tony Blair told us that introducing 24 hour drinking would make us all have a healthy attitude to drinking like (parts of) the Continent. Oops. That just ended up with very overstretched Accident and Emergency Depts.

            Moral: procede with caution when liberalising, or maybe even better: don’t liberalise. Do people really need to be getting drunk at 4am? Doesn’t the human body need about 8 hours sleep?

        • Ben

          Drug addiction is not caused by society being “too tolerant of drugs.” Here in the US we treat drug users like subhuman scum but our usage rates are not especially low at all, and we imprison more people per capita than any other country in the world. In Portugal they decriminalized all drugs and drug addiction rates are dropping. Tobacco, the most deadly drug out there, has rapidly dropping usage rates despite being legal.

          The drug war is not the answer, shaming and stigmatizing drug users is not the answer. Education and treatment is the answer.

          • Balance

            We can at least agree on one thing. The US prison system is abhorrent. But you don’t necessarily have to lock people up in inhumane conditions to be tougher on drugs/alcohol. It should be counselling etc at first. Then counselling and weekly testing and fines and tagging and community service orders for harder cases.

            But counsellors, testers, taggers etc are also an industry like the prison-industrial-complex, so it is essential that these actually work. Best way is to get people BEFORE they get addicted with tough education, not this namby pamby “life-style choices” nonsense. Life-style choices soon become life-style addictions. …And billion dollar drains on the health service (their bodies have lots of disease), treasury (junkies don’t pay taxes) and economy (they don’t work very effectively in their jobs and take too much time off work when sick).

          • Ben

            So if you give people the choice to use drugs addiction is inevitable? Why are alcoholics a relatively small proportion of the population that isn’t growing? How are tobacco usage rates going down despite it being legal.

            In fact tobacco is basically the only drug where we have had any success fighting it and it’s a legal drug, why set up an authoritarian police state to stop people from using drugs when regulation works just fine?

          • Balance

            I think tobacco and alcohol are reducing in the UK

            partly due to hard-hitting educational campaigns showing people getting mashed up in drink-driving accidents or showing blackened lungs etc

            and sadly also, the population becoming impoverished by the banksters, so having no money to buy cigs and alc.

            but also thru the “police state” banning smoking in public space (including pubs, restaurants, workplaces etc) and clampdowns by the police on selling alcohol to minors.

            They are pretty lax about drugs though and celebs seem to be let off all the time. We don’t have the same % of prison sentences for use of small amounts here.

          • Ben

            “I think tobacco and alcohol are reducing in the UK

            partly due to hard-hitting educational campaigns showing people getting mashed up in drink-driving accidents or showing blackened lungs etc”

            That’s exactly my point, regulation works fine for reducing rates of addiction. We don’t need to arrest people or drug test them and give them fines. Banning smoking in bars in restaurants makes sense because secondhand smoke causes material harm to non-smokers.

            The point is to regulate a substance to mitigate the harms to society without crushing personal freedom by flat out banning the substance. Prohibition doesn’t work as seen by the fact that countries such as the US who spend billions fighting drugs have not reduced rates of drug use, it’s a waste of money.

          • Balance

            I am open to empirical evidence on what works best, and we can agree that too much prison/police is not good. But I think you (and your pro-drugs colleagues) are grossly under-estimating the damage done by drugs (including $$$$). I think the government underestimates it deliberately because they want to keep drugs going. It’s a useful mechanism for controlling the population:

            1) people who deal with government repression by smoking a spliff are less dangerous than people who protest against the government

            2) people who are afraid the police may raid their house any minute and arrest them for drugs are less likely to protest against the government.

            So if we want to change the world, I think it’s better if people come off the weed, not to mention harder drugs.

            Also drugs experts deliberately underestimate the damage (including in health and the economy) because they want drugs to continue; it keeps their whole drugs advisory industry going (youth advisors, authors, and expert witnesses at trials make millions).

          • Mark Y

            You talk a serious amount of garbage. Laughable.

          • Balance

            CLARIFICATION:
            please note the comma after ‘authors’. It’s mainly the expert witnesses in the USA who make millions, not the youth workers

    • anon

      Not all drugs are made equal though.
      The way people group “drugs”, as if everything that isn’t alcohol or nicotine, is either heroin or methamphetamine.

      Abstinence is simply the ignorant response for someone who’s not really thought the issue though.

      • Balance

        I’ve had 30 years to think it thru, thanks. And I WOULD include nicotine as one of the worst drugs (both in terms of addictive properties and in terms of damage to the nation’s over-stretched NHS budget).

        • Mark Y

          Obesity costs the NHS £5 billion a year
          smoking costs the NHS £5 billion a year

          Tax on a packet of cigarettes is about 77%, a damn lot more than fat b4stards give to the economy. Tobacco sales add £12.3 billion to tax collected – which more than pays for the NHS costs.

          If you’re going to make wild statements, please research them first.

          • anon

            Those fatties need to start carrying their own weight.

          • A K Petterson

            Yes, I must admit I am a smoker! Couldn´t do without my cigarettes. People just have to live with that fact!

    • A K Petterson

      This very evening I happened to discover Your good thoughts of the drug-problem. I find Your remarks quite true, except for the last sentence about half a pint and the rest… Goodness me, I couldn´t survive on that! I most certainly have never used any form of drugs and I am completely unfamiliar with that kind of intoxication. But I´ll be damned if I didn´t get my usual quantities of lager and vodka! (I am moderate, though, nota bene.)

  • lohtar

    Think the author makes some fair points.

    Would like to add that our well-being generally would also massively benefit when our world, y’know, would be a little more tolerant. When we are not the people most likely to fall victim to hate-crime. When are parents do not assume us when we’re still kids to be straight or cis by default. When our leaders tell hypocritical and nonsensical religious leaders to STFU or be gone. When our representations in the media are fair and accurate (getting better, but still a long way to go). When we are not characterized as a single sex-act but seen for the whole persons we are, in all our unique diversity. When we have full equality in each and every way.

    Y’know, all the stuff straight and cis folk never have to think about nor are affected by. If we had that, drug use would drop significantly and the queer factor would not play a role anymore (then we just use drugs to battle depression over all the other things going wrong in our world).

    Btw, I am absolutely not against occasional recreational drug use. When people do so responsibly more power to you. This is completely hypothetical, but I can imagine queer folk being tempted to use this easier as they are ‘outcasts’ nevertheless so the extra judgment for using substances doesn’t matter. And when it adds to the moment for some people, why not when done safely? I guess in our community there’s less judgment, which may be an additional (sort of good) reason for more prevalent use among us queer folk.

  • Jan Bridget

    It seems to me that little has changed (apart from the kind of drugs used) since I first met Monty at a national lesbians, gays and alcohol conference I organised at Manchester University in 1999 when Monty gave a presentation. In fact, I think there might even have been more services back then targeted at meeting our needs.

    I hope Monty’s optimism is right in that now there is ‘official’ evidence of the
    needs of LGB people (and it will be similar if not worse for trans) we will be
    included in local health needs assessments and in the planning and provision of
    services. But, like the few improvements in other health inequality areas such as mental health, I’m not holding my breath.

    I certainly can see little (or no) change in services meeting the needs of young LGBTs, if anything there are fewer support services now. If we can intervene up-stream and enable our youth to develop positive identities they are less likely to need and use alcohol and drugs to cope. It needs some significant change and, frankly, I don’t know where this will come from.

    I would also like to add that I think there should be more done about the visibility, and response to the needs, of lesbian and bisexual women (not to mention trans). We consistently fall through the net when talking about drug and alcohol use (and other health inequalities).

    By the way, I am not sure that LGBT young people are using less alcohol and drugs!

    • http://thebisexualbangladeshi.blogspot.com Traveller_23

      Reporting back as a younger LGBT person :P

      I’m not sure health services for LGBT people have gotten worse, at least in major urban centres like London, Birmingham, Manchester etc. I’ve taken past male partners who were afraid of their potential results or needles to various clinics to get them tested. I’ve also visited a couple of clinics myself. None of these were LGBT specific places, but they always dealt with me/friends/partners well, and the health professionals were able to tailor things to our needs. Now, I know this is anecdotal – is it different outside England, or in rural areas?

      Also anecdotally, nah drug and alcohol use don’t seem to have gone down! The alcohol IMO isn’t a LGBT specific thing – almost all socialisation I’ve encountered in the UK revolves around alcohol!

      • Jan Bridget

        I think sexual health clinics are different although in Calderdale my experience of yg people accessing an accepting and supportive service has been hit and miss – depending on who saw them. I was thinking more about substance misuse services and mental health and more generally GPs and A & E. Over the 13 years I supported LGBT yg people in Calderdale many f the services aimed at yg people were ubable to meet the needs of LGBT youth, partly their homophobic attitudes, partly ignorance.

        I accessed the needs of members throughout this period and more recently was able to compare the results with local school health survey and consistently the results for substance misuse and mental health issues were signifcantly higher, this is similar to research elsewhere in the world.

        I was also

        • Jan Bridget

          I was also thinking about LGBT youth groups, i may be wrong but i have kept an eye n things over a long time and it seems to me there are less groups now than there used to be. See findings for Youth Chances re providers and commissioners.

          At the same time, homophobic bullying is rife in our schools and the majority are not tackling it. Put this alongside fact that LGBT youth are coming out earlier and you find a highly vulnerable group of yg people with few services meeting their needs.

          Of course things tend to be better in major cities and always have been. Similarly we cannot lump all young LGBT people together, some are far more vulnerable than others – see research just published in USA

        • http://thebisexualbangladeshi.blogspot.com Traveller_23

          I see I was thinking quite narrowly in terms of healthcare. I think I was very lucky – I got mental health support from counsellors at my uni who were ran a voluntary service (they were L&G themselves).

          My GP and local A&E hospital have been great, but again I live in a major urban centre so that may skew things. I want to add as an aside – if only to combat stereotypes – my Muslim doctor was completely fine discussing gay anal sex with me!

  • JackAlison

    “Why is drug use higher in the gay community?”
    very simple answer. PAIN. and wanting to feel CONNECTED.
    if there was no need to ESCAPE the grind of reality and life was a drug……which endorphins of happiness are then no need to take them.
    if you are unsure when you will be next physically mentally socially abused then having a backup with drugs suspends reality and numbs pain
    remember that drugs are usually social
    so the impulse of connecting with the other is a good one…the drug path there to that connection if not taken in moderation seldom is
    it is only recently that marriage equality was legalized
    it is a HUGE assault on anyones self esteem to be told repeatedly that your relationship to other gay men both initmate and platonic is not valued. at the heart of most homophobia by religion in particular is the attempt to deny family and generational history of gay ppl. if you successfully extinguish a persons lineage you void them and make them a nothing. it is a DEEP DEEP assault on a gay persons psyche to try and make them have no family no relationship and no connectedness and this is precisely what churches set out to do. It is very very telling that C of E bishops insist that gays priests can live together but have no intimate relations. and another obsession with the churches is the children of gay men and women.

  • Mario

    I think part of the reason that I have noticed is that, for many gay men, in order to fell part of the gay community and accepted, one must undergo all types of activities in order to satisfy ones need to feel accepted. This includes, and is not limited to, drug taking, sleeping around, being the centre of attention and so on.

    Gay men can be their own worst enemies, in that their own liberalism to themselves almost acts as an invitation to a ‘nothing is barred’ attitude and this shouldn’t be the case.

    As a society, we all need values, and just because someones gay, doesn’t mean we cannot have a bar set at a certain standard.

    ADVICE: Learn to have some respect, dignity and self-love.

    • Ben

      Your comment is hypocritical, first you say that gays feel pressured to participate in certain activities and then you say that the “‘nothing is barred’ attitude shouldn’t be the case.”

      Some people can handle drug use and sex positivity just fine thank you very much, by saying that gays shouldn’t have “liberal” attitudes about these things you’re guilty of the same thing you just condemned, trying to pressure people into acting a certain way. Mind your own business and worry about your own actions.

      • Mario

        You make no sense. This is a comment section so we can all have opinions. If you cannot handle it then do not read them

        Secondly if people are handling drug use and casual sex so well, then why are HIV rates rising as well as other STD’s?

        • Ben

          You’re a hypocrite because you criticize society for pressuring gays to act a certain way and then you yourself go tell people to act a certain way.

          HIV and STDs are spread almost exclusively by UNPROTECTED sex. If you want to avoid HIV the answer is to protect yourself not to promote sex negativity, especially now that PREP is a thing. If you use condoms and PREP or even just condoms reliably your chances of getting HIV are extremely low. Even HIV and health organizations always say the problem is lack of protection, sex is not the problem.

          • Mario

            No, if you read my post clearly, you will see that I did not criticise society for pressuring gays to act in a certain way. (Read it again)

            Have you not read about the link between chemsex and HIV transmission?

          • Ben

            Yes, I’d advise you don’t mix drugs and sex together if it’s the sort of drug that might lead to unsafe sexual choices. You can still enjoy them separately in a perfectly safe manner though.

          • Mario

            Who are you kidding? Me or yourself?

          • Ben

            You’re the one who said that marijuana was more harmful than alcohol which is disproved by every study ever done on the topic.

            http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2010/11/drugs_cause_most_harm

            Go ahead find me a study that disagrees.

          • Mario

            Denial. First sign of madness.

          • Balance

            I’m curious, Ben, defender of drugs, as PREP costs around £10,000 per year, how many grannies do you want to stop having their hip replacements (at £5,000 to the NHS) to allow for this extravagance. Their hip replacements allow them to walk with less pain – many can hardly walk at all before. So over a ten year period, for 1 million pounds, you could either sort out 200 grannies or sort out a mere 10 drug-addled people who can’t be arsed to wear a condom to their meth orgies. I’d chose the 200 grannies.

          • Ben

            Nice field of strawmen you have set up there idiot. If you could read you would see that I said to use condoms and don’t have sex while using drugs.

            Also, the most common drug used by gays is marijuana, which is in no way connected to higher rates of HIV transmission. I’m not a fan of meth by any means, I just don’t think people deserve jail or shaming for using it.

          • Balance

            You did not just say “use condoms”. Your post 1 hour ago says “if you use condoms and PREP…” without considering that each PREP user blocks 20 grannies from their hip-replacement operation (over a ten year period). It seems that some people are very free with other people’s money.
            Sorry for the NHS and British pounds references, I didn’t realise you were in the US.
            PREP costs US$13,000 per year. This was my main point which YOU haven’t really responded to.

            And I don’t think meth orgies are strawmen. They are very common here in London and AIDS rates are skyrocketting. People should be ashamed (I realise I’ve naughtily obscured your original point about shaming). Getting addicted to cigarettes or marijuana is often followed by harder stuff later. People need to be taught about addiction in general (also porn and gambling).

  • Ben

    Drug use in itself is not a problem, drug addiction is a problem. People need to stop treating all drug use as inherently problematic, for many people its no different than having a beer or glass of wine with dinner. This is especially true since the most popular illegal drug, marijuana, is less harmful and less addictive than alcohol.

    • Mario

      The problem is, the type of affects the drugs have. Marijuna can induce states of paranoia, anxiety and psychotic states whereas alcohol causes depression, and organ damage which is more physical in effect.

      I dont know about you, but Id assume the affects of marijuna are worse than that of alcohol.

      • anon

        Your assumption would be wrong however.
        Alcohol is both more (physically) harmful, and more dependence forming that marijuana.

        Smoking tobacco and marijuana have about equal potential to cause long term lung disease, though vaporizing marijuana removes that risk.

        Bottom line, I feel policing marijuana is simply a waste of tax payer money.

        • Mario

          Yes I see what you are saying. And maybe it is a waste of money. I just feel that we already have enough social problems with alcohol and cigarettes, and I don’t think that adding another drug for common use is the right thing to do.

          • anon

            I’d be ok with banning tobacco at this stage.
            e-cigarettes basically obsolete normal cigarettes without the lung cancer and anti-social smoke.

            Each drug needs its own unique policy based on science, and health system / social impact.

      • Ben

        Completely wrong, here’s a study from the lancet, one of the top medical journals. Alcohol and heroin are the worst, marijuana isn’t even in the same ballpark.

        http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61462-6/abstract

        Science is the way to go, not kneejerk prudery.

        • Mario

          Marijana isn’t used in the study.

          Look, you can do what you want. Go do drugs till your insides rot, go have sex as much as you want till theres no one left. But then, do not expect anyone to respect you or take pride in your choices. No one wants to be with a hoe.

          • Ben

            In my generation enjoying sex does not make you a “hoe,” that is an outdated sex-negative concept. The notion that the amount of sex you have defines your worth as a person is preposterous. It is in the study if you read the full text, it’s not mentioned in the abstract because its harm is much lower than the other drugs it mentions there.

          • Mario

            You can enjoy sex without sleeping with just about anyone you can find. In fact, id say that sex with someone you’re in a relationship with is far more comfortable and enjoyable. Not to mention the emotional connection one makes with a long-term partner.

            Everything we do in life defies ones worth. That’s just reality I’m afraid. We are all defined by what we bring to the table.

          • Ben

            “You can enjoy sex without sleeping with just about anyone you can find. In fact, id say that sex with someone you’re in a relationship with is far more comfortable and enjoyable.”

            Wow it’s almost as if different people can have different opinions about things without telling other people how to live! Luckily I have not met many other people my age who would judge someone negatively for having casual sex, straight or gay. I think that attitude is dying off which is a great thing.

          • Mario

            Your deluded Ben.

          • Ben

            You’re deluded*

            If you’re going to be a smug self-righteous authoritarian at least use correct spelling as not to look like a fool.

          • Mario

            Wow! Good on you for noticing my errors. It’s a shame you’re not so pedantic about your sexual encounters as you are my grammar and vocabulary, otherwise you really would of had a leg to stand on ey.

          • Balance

            My fellow anti-druggie, Mario, I don’t want to give Ben the satisfaction of correcting your post 4 mins ago, so I will!! It’s “would HAVE had a leg to stand on”.

            Yours in combat
            Balance

          • Mario

            lol. Thanx buddie.

            yours
            Robin

          • Mark Y

            Who the fck do you think you are. Get over yourself. You’ve got issues. Sort your own head out instead of having a go at other people with your pathetic judgements.

          • Mario

            Who’s having a go? I’m just stating my opinion which seems to be emotionally effecting you.

          • Rumbelow

            That should have read, “emotionally affecting you” not “emotionally effecting you”

          • JasonT

            “would have” not “would of”

          • Mario

            Yes I did get the reminder thank you. Have you not seen the correction made above? I assume the readers, such as yourself, actually READ the posts…

          • Creator Ley

            You’re*

          • Edgar Carpenter

            And you, unfortunately, bring a narrow, self-centered view of sex and relationships to the table – you clearly have no idea how many other people experience and enjoy a multitude of relationships. I expect you will attack me now with some comment about worth and emotional connections and caricatured descriptions of non-monogamous people that will just underscore how limited your personal understanding is.

          • Mario

            Just because an activity is enjoyed, does not make it correct or positive. This ideology just doesn’t cut the grain.

        • Sister Mary Clarence

          Drugs ruin lives. They done ruin everyone’s life, but until you start necking them you don’t know whether you’re going to be one of the lucky ones or one of the unlucky ones.

          Its got nothing to do with knee jerk prudery, its go to do with a very, very long line of wrecked lives, and lives ended prematurely.

          I’m sick to death of hearing people banging on about them not being all bad, or excuse the trail of destruction they cause to people’s lives.

          They’re an escape, but after you’ve escaped you always have to come back to everything you’ve tried to escape from. Its still there, and usually its worse than when you left it, only to return again less equipped to deal with it.

          The London gay scene is awash with people whose lives have been totally wrecked by drugs in all sorts of ways – and yet those not yet in that same boat carry on as though nothing is wrong.

  • clive

    Homophobia – internalised or otherwise, heterosexism, harassment – take your pick. The same reasons a whole range of mental health problems are higher amongst LGB & T people. Which is why we need specialist mental health and drugs support workers for LGB & T communities – not a reduction of them, as has recently happened where I live.

  • Read Fagburn.com

    Gay men take drugs for the same reason they have sex – it’s fun.
    Stop being such a prudish nerd.

    • Brian Apple

      Taking drugs isn’t fun when they destroy the immune system or cause addictions.

      • Read Fagburn.com

        Which they usually don’t.

        • Sister Mary Clarence

          …. but some do ….

  • Marty Kane

    It’s to help deal with their horrible sin. I’m joking, i’m joking. Gay men have less responsibility and therefore can go from smoking a joint to partying hard and eventually even developing an addiction. Straight lads who party can end up with kids and that, so they’re settled down before reaching that point where sniffing coke every day is the norm. In a nut shell I think it’s just lack of responsibility.

    • Brian Apple

      I totally agree.

  • Brian Apple

    Gay men have refined the art of hedonism. They know they won’t ever get married to women and have children, so they go all out with a party lifestyle that involves drugs, drinks and promiscuity. As they age, it becomes a cycle of endless nothings. There is no progression. Sorry but it’s true.

    I’m a supporter of gay rights but not the gay lifestyle choices many gay men make.

    • Marty Kane

      I’m a supporter of gay rights but not the gay lifestyle choices many gay men make.

      Big +1 on this line.

      • Rumbelow

        There’s always a big “BUT” with you self-deluded fakes.

    • peeps99

      Doesn’t describe my life, nor the life of many gay people I know. So maybe not so true eh?

  • Edgar Carpenter

    My experience with laws which attacked my very existence as a gay man taught me to question laws, and see if they’re based on real concerns or on prejudices. The same happened with “experts”, who said ugly and disgusting things about me and other gay people, brandishing made-up “facts” which could not survive scrutiny. Many people’s opinions and many laws are based on a distrust of pleasure, and a desire to curb other people’s enjoyment in life.

    So – I find marijuana to be a pleasant and congenial substance which enhances many situations. I’d much rather smoke a little pot than have a couple of drinks. And it has never caused me a whit of trouble – it’s often beneficial.

    There will be some here who will claim to know my life better than I do, and who will make up some problems they will say I have experienced as a result of smoking marijuana. Silly twats.

  • Em

    I agree with Ben. I also think that living on the fringes of society makes you more likely to question societal norms, morals and laws, which includes therefore being more open minded to trying new things and finding out what you enjoy personally, rather than just following what society wants you to do

  • Ra

    Drugs are not the problem, it is a symptom of the problem. Personal and social problems lead people to self-administer drugs. We live in a world where GLBT people are constantly subjected to enormous pressure to be something other than self: considered outcast, have to fight for rights, subjected to discrimination from every race and religion, blamed for the weather catastrophes, legislated to be tortured, publically ridiculed and bullied, hunted, assaulted and killed, feel hopeless to help our brothers and sisters that are being tortured and killed in other countries, ignored by the … . Some of our brothers and sisters suffer some of the most hideous atrocities of society, and many live under the constant pressure and fear, even in our families. Some – most- GLBT are castrated on every level: socially, sexually, intellectually, medically, intimately and spiritually. Under those conditions, I am surprised we are all not taking drugs to numb the pain we feel. May courage and strength be with you all. Stand strong.

  • k uyewcv

    Mental health issues and low self esteem are common place in the gay community also sigma gay males face can turn them to use hard drugs, however hedonism and a party lifestyle can also lead to this.

These comments are un-moderated and do not necessarily represent the views of PinkNews. If you believe that a comment is inappropriate or libellous, please contact us.

Top commenters this week

Latest stories

See all