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CEO of Pride Glasgow backs Scottish independence

  • HerSelfTheElf

    Nooo pleas don’t leave us Scotland, without your vote we will have a perpetual Tory Government, you can’t do that to us!

    • RobVancouver

      I can totally understand your feelings. However, your fellow English (I am going on a limb here and assume you are English) have become so nationalistic and self-absorbed that they think that if they cannot bully the rest of the EU they will just leave it and be better off. Maybe an independent Scotland will wake up England and see how small it really is.

      • Robert W. Pierce

        My fellow Englishmen are not all nationalistic as you imply. We maybe a small nation geographically, but not small enough to occupy one of the 5 permanent seats of the UN Security Council and a powerful voice in Europe. I can predict that Brexit is not going to happen. Polls have consistently revealed that the majority of the British people want to remain in the EU. We’re NOT bullying anyone contrary to what you might read. There are quite a number of member EU states who agree that reform is needed and indeed it is. Even Chancellor Merkel has conceded that as well as Commissioner Juncker. Be very careful when you make blanket statements about an entire country and its people. We’re not all pro Cameron as evidenced by a hung parliament in the last election and we’re certainly not all anti-EU. 90% of our businesses large and small want to remain in the EU, important for the economy, freedom of movement and jobs. Cameron knows it, all three parties know it.

        • Peter Swallow

          Cameron has washed away all bargaining power he had in Europe. We can get stuff done in Europe, but not with him as PM and a Eurosceptic nobody as commissioner.

          • Lyn Thomas

            Scotland is a more progressive country than England under the SNP – we can see that in their provision in health and education. The Tories plan to remove us from the ECHR making the rUK a pariah state. I just wish that Wales was as far along the road as Scotland. Oh and for your information Plaid Cymru adopted a platform for LGBT equality in 1976 when the Labour party was still running scared and the Tories were virulently anti. The civic nationalism of the Welsh and Scots is light years ahead of the regressive nationalism and Little Britain attitudes of the likes of UKIP and the project fear/ Better Together campaign

      • Robert W. Pierce

        If you want to accuse an EU member of being a bully, have you given thoughts to Spain facing its own separatist movement with the Catalans and Basques? It has stated that in the event of Scotland gaining Independence, it will issue a veto to prevent Scotland from becoming a member. In order for Scotland to do that, it would require a positive vote of all member states.

    • Peter Swallow

      Don’t worry, you won’t! “The results are not quite the cementation of Tory rule alluded to by Labour et al. Out of the 18 general elections since 1945 only two would have resulted in a Labour win being turned into a Tory win. One in 1964 where a Labour overall majority of 13 would be replaced with a Conservative overall majority of eight, and again in February 1974 where Labour’s four seat lead would be replaced with a 15 seat lead for the Conservatives. None of the results which brought Thatcher, Major or Blair to power would have changed significantly enough to alter the outcome of the largest parties of those elections.” (http://internationalsocialist.org.uk/) The only major thing that will happen will be there will be a small shift towards the right as Labour targets votes elsewhere.

      • Barry Scarfe

        Scotland gets the government it votes for most of the time: http:www.aforceforgood.org.uk/debunk/vote1

        In 2010, the rest of the United Kingdom voted for a majority Tory government but got a coalition between the Lib Dems and the Conservatives because of the large contingent of Labour MPs from Scotland.

        Really, we ought to have a PR system with the whole United Kingdom voting as one. This would also integrate NI into the UK more.

        • Peter Swallow

          Yeah, if we were an independent country we’d get the government we voted for all the time. 1 > 2/3

          • Chuck Jones

            who would get the government we voted for all the time?

  • Leonard Woodrow

    “Where is the sense in breaking up something that works well?”

    Deporting people to face persecution in their own country can hardly be described as ‘working well’, can it?

  • That There Other David

    I’m past caring whether Scotland stays or goes, as I’m sure whatever the result we’ll make it work, but I really wish they’d brought the date forward so it was over already. The debate has long got past the point where interest began to wane.

  • ItchycooMark

    Scottish votes don’t really tilt the balance that much. We’ll leave you with the corruption of Downing Street. Selling arms illegally, selling the NHS and Royal Mail so their pals can profit, covering up systematic child abuse. Sorry it’s boring you That There David but it is quite a momentous occasion for a 5 million people, but you’ll all be welcome to join us

    • Barry Scarfe

      Scottish MPs prevented the idiot Cameron from launching an ill-conceived war against Syria!

      • Charles Gormley

        But couldn’t prevent Thatcher destroying our industry, or imposing the community charge.

        • Barry Scarfe

          She destroyed industry in England and Wales too not just Scotland. However, saying that, Tony Bliar and his government didn’t exactly revive industry and I doubt whether the SNP will be able to do it.

  • gregipoh

    I’m quite surprised- I remember how strongly Alex Salmond backed Cardinal O’Brien’s campaign of homophobic hatred and vitriolic rants- not so long ago.

    • ItchycooMark

      its not about Alex Salmond, its about a nations right to make its own decisions and look to a new better future. He/his party did introduce an equal marriage bill that was more equal than some other countries, plus free prescriptions, eye tests, dental checks etc. so credit were its due

      • Robert W. Pierce

        What is Scotland doing about the future of the currency? I would think this would be a crucial point to get sorted prior to the referendum. It’s unlikely it will be the pound because that will mean currency union with the UK with all control coming from London but there’s no way the UK could be lender of last resort in the event of a Scottish fiscal crisis if Scotland becomes independent making it essentially a foreign country at that point.

        • Barry Scarfe

          Alex Salmond says the British government is “bluffing” and it will all be right on the night so he doesn’t need a ‘plan B’ NOT SO!. There are quite a few reasons why a currency union between two supposedly independent states wouldn’t work. The electorate in the ‘RUK’ wouldn’t wear a currency union even if Westminster was prepared to concede it and they’re not.

          • Robert W. Pierce

            Exactly right, Barry. Further, the Bank of England has stressed it more than enough that it is unworkable. All three parties are on the same page on this one. In any event, even if such a currency union were allowed, Scotland would still not be entirely independent with Westminster controlling the currency and interest rates. I fail to see how the Bank of England could act as lender of last resort for what would be a foreign country. It doesn’t exist anywhere on the planet.

          • Barry Scarfe

            I agree. The worldwide financial crisis which started in late 2008 showed just how fragile the banking system can be and how many billions treasury ministers need to inject into the system to shore it up. The financial services industry in Scotland is EVEN LARGER as a proportion of the Scottish economy that it is with regard to the British economy as a whole (and it is too large overall with the British economy. Basically, our economy is too dominated by services and financial institutions and manufacturing doesn’t comprise enough of it).

            Alex Salmond wants there to be a currency union between two supposedly independent states YET to make it work on a durable longterm basis it would require a newly ‘independent’ Scotland to cede some degree of national sovereignty to the Bank of England. In short, his plans would very likely replicate the problems we have seen in the Euro area. A political union is really required to make it work and that sort of concept is what Alex Salmond and his party want to move away from!

          • Robert W. Pierce

            I echo your view entirely. I don’t think Salmond has really thought this through. It’s quite evident the Scottish people aren’t being given all the facts to make an informed decision in September. That said, my gut feeling is that Independence won’t happen.

          • Peter Swallow

            You’re both assuming that RUK has the ability to stop a currency union. ROI (roughly the same size as Scotland) used the pound for years without the Bank of England’s approval, and they were fine. And a currency union, official or not, would give us as much say over our currency as we currently have; 0. The argument that we would lose autonomy over our currency if we voted for independence doesn’t stand up, because we don’t have autonomy over it at the moment.

          • Barry Scarfe

            We can’t legally stop you from using the pound Sterling. That is entirely true. However, do you really want to be like Panama and use the currency of a foreign independent state? The American Treasury Secretary doesn’t take into account the economic conditions prevailing in Panama when he decides what to do with American interest rates. He sets them according to what is in the best interests of the USA and its people. The pound in your pocket is not just a means of exchange. If another financial crisis hits, you would have no bank of last resort to underpin it ‘ Using the pound unofficially would be risky as you wouldn’t have a central bank to underpin the financial system in Scotland if the banks appear to be on the brink of collapse as they were in 2008. Alistair Darling had to rapidly pump-in billions upon billions into several banks as they were going to implode and run out of money within a few hours before he took this action.

            The truth is Alex Salmond has hit upon this stance to try to make the concept of independence less risky and therefore persuade more people to vote for it. He should have said from the off that an independent Scotland would have its own currency and not try and share the currency of the United Kingdom.

            http://notesfromnorthbritain.wordpress.com

          • Peter Swallow

            OK, firstly, our economy is so closely tied with Britain that if another financial crash happens it would be within Britain’s best interests to help us out. Secondly, the SNP (only one party, but still worth listening to) has promised to stock-pile money in case of a crash. If Scotland knows it doesn’t have a central bank to bail it out, it’s not going to just carry on its merry way! It doesn’t need a central bank to keep it afloat if it has its own store-room of money. And the Bank of England (the Chancellor has no say) considers Scotland’s needs very little when setting interest rates now anyway, so leaving a formal currency union would hardly shake up the world. I actually want an independent Scotland on the Euro, but I also think an independent Scotland could perfectly happily keep the pound.

          • Charles Gormley

            The bank of England doesn’t even consider England’s needs – only London matters.

          • Charles Gormley

            Keep the pound. And the debt that is tied to it.

          • Brian Hill

            The decision to bail out banks is one taken where the financial risk occurs, That’s why in the crash USA shored up UK banks such as RBS and Barclays. This is a political decision to prevent economic meltdown. Interestingly Iceland did’t go that route and has recovered rather well for small nation. The UK similarly took the same decision as the US, to protect the financial sector, As a result we’ve built the present austerity regime on the laissez-faire regulatory regime that caused the crisis. Now we have had measures like quantitative easing which trickled down about 2% of the fiscal input to where it was needed. The rest went into the financial sector who kept it to shore up themselves.

          • Charles Gormley

            The bank of England has said no such thing. Mark Carey said it is a political decision.

      • PaulBrownsey

        But it may not be a new better future. And why worry about the rights of those strange things called “nations”? The rights of people are the only things worth worrying about.

    • gregipoh
  • daveG

    This guy obviously prefers a divisive nationalist campaign funded by the arch-homophobe Brian Souter, and supported by a motley collection of christian groups ‘for independence’, to solidarity with the rest of us in the UK. The SNP has a very chequered past in terms of supporting gay rights, but will say anything to get elected. Gay rights is above and beyond nationalism – and Nationalists are very often the people who hate us most around the world. Be very careful what you wish for.

    • RobVancouver

      It is hard to show solidarity with the English who are terribly nationalistic and have trouble cooperating with other nations. The actions of the English in the EU show that. It is interesting to see Cameron clamoring for more EU unity in foreign affairs now that it is needed in the aftermath of MH17. Apparently he does see the need when it hits him in the face.

      • Robert W. Pierce

        You’re painting all of us English with the same brush. It’s tantamount to saying all Canadians are as bad as Stephen Harper. Very dangerous to make blanket statements like that. FYI, much of the ECHR law was written by the English. Cameron doesn’t represent all English people, I never voted for him and his party didn’t exactly get a majority in 2010 with a hung parliament, proof that we don’t all support him. The majority of us want to remain in the EU according to opinion polls conducted over the past year and probably will. If UKIP weren’t around, a minority party without one MP there would be no EU referendum in 2017.

        • RobVancouver

          No, I am not painting all of the English with the same brush, but on average they are nationalistic, as can be seen by the amount that voted for UKIP. I am focusing on the actions of the English in the EU, the actions have been very nationalistic and devoid of cooperation in the past. Again, that is not every single English person, but it is the government of the UK. I am hoping that Scottish independence will wake people up who need waking up to see that nationalism is not the answer.

          • Robert W. Pierce

            The amount that voted for UKIP has still not been significant enough to effect on MP elected to Parliament. That trend will continue as their popularity is now in slow decline. Well, Scottish Independence supporters are nationalists too, so perhaps that won’t be the answer for Scotland either. Do you think Quebec should be independent?

          • Peter Swallow

            It is fair to say that the English tend to, as a whole, vote for more right-wing parties and be more Eurosceptic; obviously, though, there are also sane English.

          • Barry Scarfe

            Yes, we do but I wonder what Scottish voters would do if there were more immigrants in Scotland than there is compared to England. At the moment, you are still relatively unaffected by mass immigration compared to us.

          • Barry Scarfe

            It is difficult to say how UKIP’s support will develop. I believe they will obtain far more votes than they did last time (about 3.1% of the national vote) but I still think they will get only a maximum of about 9%. UKIP has little chance of getting an MP because their vote is too thinly spread and due to our crazy and archaic system of First Past The Post they are unlikely to have support concentrated enough in a single constituency or more to get more votes than the other candidates and thus obtain an MP. There are some promising seats around Britain for them but you still need to get at least 25% or more in a single constituency to have any chance of electing an MP and preferably you need more. The record is held by a former Liberal Democrat MP in Scotland who got about 25.9% of the vote in a Highlands constituency during the 1992 general election. The lowest winning shares last time was the Lib Dem MP in Norwich South who got 29% and the Green Party’s share of 31% in Brighton Pavillon. Nigel Farage got UKIP’s highest share in 2010 in the seat of Buckingham of 17% but he probably only done so well because it was the Speaker’s seat and by convention the major parties don’t stand against the Speaker of the House of Commons.

          • Barry Scarfe

            It isn’t just the English though. UKIP obtained MEPs in Wales and also got one in Scotland though perhaps that was canny Unionist Scots showing their usual mastery of the tactic of tactical voting to prevent the SNP winning a possible third MEP.

            The Engiish are only a bit more Eurosceptic than the Welsh and the Scots. There is no huge and unbridgeable gulf between the attitudes of the English, Welsh and Scots with regard to EU membership.

          • Peter Swallow

            Well, actually, the percentage of votes for UKIP in Scotland was far lower than anywhere else. And should we become independent and therefore get more MEPs (the smaller Ireland has 12) we would still only have one UKIP MEP so long as we had fewer than 14 seats because of the way the votes are divided.

            As for immigration, the SNP has actually said that they will encourage immigration because it will help to balance out the needs of an aging population by creating a larger workforce. Scotland has plenty of space! (The SNP is not the only party, but if they can be popular and so blatantly pro-immigration it shows how different our voters are on some issues…)

          • Barry Scarfe

            Why does a supposedly nationalist party want to encourage immigration? That is totally bizarre. What price Scotland’s identity and culture then? You will be swamped and Scotland will rapidly cease to be truely Scottish.

          • Peter Swallow

            That’s a very ignorant point of view. The myth of multiculturalism degrading a society’s native culture should have been retired years ago. Scotland’s culture has survived an influx of English (myself one of them), Italians, Irish etc. and gained from such diversity. The SNP are nationalist in that they want the best for Scotland and its people; only a few of its shadier characters limit the definition of “its people” to those with true, blue Scottish blood.

          • Barry Scarfe

            It’s fine to have a small amount of ‘diversity’ and we English and Scots aren’t all that different but once the amount becomes substantial then I’m afraid the original culture will be diminished somewhat through sheer pressure of numbers. After all, doesn’t the entire concept of diversity require there to be diversity and not ‘swamping’ of one culture by another?

      • Peter Swallow

        Yeah, the SNP are not right-wing. They’re socialists. Also, the Green party are also Yes supporters. And an independent Scotland would almost certainly be more liberal, because the Conservatives and right-wing parties do terribly north of the border. An independent Scotland would have a voice on the international stage, which it would almost certainly use to speak out for greater LGBTQI equality around the world; something the more right-wing Westminster political elite is always loathe to do!

        • Barry Scarfe

          The Conservative and Unionist Party has declined a lot in Scotland but at the last election it still polled around 16% of the vote which was only 3% behind the number of votes the SNP obtained.The Tory Party’s problem in Scotland is due to their vote being too spread-out all around Scotland and therefore not getting the number of MPs their votes should be able to elect. I have little sympathy for them though as they support the archaic nonsense of FPTP which causes this.

          • Peter Swallow

            Well, Scotland’s parliament is actually partially elected on proportional representation… And a major party, let alone the government, polling at 16% is pretty dismal!

          • Barry Scarfe

            You are not comparing like with like. I’m talking about the Conservative and Unionist Party’s performance in BRITISH GENERAL elections and not the elections for Holyrood which uses a fairly proportional voting method of the Additional Member System (AMS) and not the archaic fraud of FPTP.

            On the performance of 2010, the Conservative and Unionist Party is only slightly less popular than the SNP (they received just 3% less votes) however due to FPTP they only got one seat as their votes are nowdays too thinly-spread around Scotland and FPTP is a crazy system that only rewards parties with representation if their votes are ‘lumpy’ and not too geographically spread-out.

    • Barry Scarfe

      I agree that many ‘nationalists’ hate gay and bisexual people though not all. There is NOTHING in inherent nationalist philosophy that obligates nationalists into opposing gay rights (If anything, I would say it is the opposite). You can be a liberal nationalist!

    • Charles Gormley

      What utter rubbish. Every party in the UK has a chequered past in terms of supporting gay rights and say what you like, Brian Souter’s money has not allowed him to influence the SNP policy on sexuality in any way shape or form. Also, it is pretty churlish of you to conflate the civic nationalism of the SNP with other nationalist movements around the world. How about you credit ‘the guy’ with the intelligence to have made up his own mind about the campaign rather than foist your own divisiveness onto him? The SNP plan to write equality into a written constitution if they form the Scottish Government after a referendum win. The current government of the UK plans to take us out of the ECHR which has been the single piece of legislation that forced successive (labour and conservative) governments to give us our rights to equal age of consent, service in the army, gender recognition for transexuals. You want to talk about divisive nationalism? How about the discussion on leaving the EU, or the vicious targeting of immigrants. Don’t confuse Scottish nationalism with the public face of ‘British’ nationalsm.

      • bob

        It Got him a knighthood thanks to the SNP

  • ItchycooMark

    Look who’s funding the NO side, the tax avoiding CEO of Vitol Ian Taylor and a cabal of right wing tory funders. Look at the funders of any large party and there are unsavoury characters. At least Souter wasn’t allowed to influence the marriage bill. Every party is guilty of saying anything to get elected and they all have chequered pasts on that topic, so a bit of perspective is needed on that and just as a reminder, as people seem to forget very easily, this referendum isnt about the SNP its a bigger picture than that. The vote on 18 Sept is “should Scotland be an independent country”, not do you support the SNP. So, if you think it shouldn’t, then vote no

    • Barry Scarfe

      Technically-speaking, you are entirely correct. However, it is very probable that if the vote is a Yes then the SNP would be in power for at least the first ten years or more because they would be rewarded for being the party to achieve ‘independence’.

    • Chuck Jones

      Why is it fair that you get to say a ‘no’ vote is a vote for the tories but a ‘yes’ vote is not a vote for the SNP?

  • Mikeylano

    The Scotland issue is moot as far as I’m concerned. Europe needs to federate.

  • MopMop

    This makes me sad. Even the arguing comments make me sad. I don’t realistically see how an independent Scotland can do better for the LGBT community. SNP have us in a situation where the friggin’ Tories have beaten us on equality. Even though it was promised, even though we all want it, queer Scots still can’t get married. Not yet. When, exactly? When we elect a new party? One that will be a UK party and will simply follow their UK counterpart?

    I have a lot of issues with anyone making out that the Scottish Parliament/Government is “successful” when it comes to civil rights. Even outside the homophobic MSPs and broken LGBT equality promises – appointed guardians, centralisation, armed police… And so many of the groups I’d expect to be fighting such things are just letting it happen to the favour of constantly having a go at Westminster and a “we’ll sort it all out later” attitude.

    Considering the reality of the situation (that it’s a very divided vote) the reality of forcing a large minority into a new state, forcing a large minority to put their rights, their citizenship, their indentities, their stability, all on the line when they clearly expressed they do not want to…I have a lot of issues with that. More still with how few people even recognise it as a problem. There’s a reason why such major decisions often require a special majority from *actually* democratic countries.

    I don’t want this. I don’t want to put UK funding for Scottish LGBT resources on the line. I don’t want to put my platform of privilege to help further afield, on the line. I like being part of the UK queer community, it’s part of me, of who I am. I don’t want to lose it. I’d rather fight together.

    I don’t think he’s wrong for it, he should express his opinion if he feels strongly, but having such figures so passionately for Yes makes me feel…actually really isolated and like I’m not understood anymore, as part of the community. Glasgow’s my home, I was so proud last night with the our Commonwealth approach to equality. But this… it’s stupid and dramatic and prolly irrational but…yeah, this whole thing just depresses me.

    • Charles Gormley

      What commonwealth approach to equality are you referring to? The one where most of the countries consider homosexuality a perversion worthy of imprisonment, or the one where it is considered worthy of death?
      We will be able to marry next year – have you been following the progress of the ASP through Parliament? Glasgow is also my home; i was also proud of it last night, but i was proud of it as a Scottish city, not a city of the UK. Queer resources are already majority funded by the Scottish Parliament as, largely, they are health based and local authority funded – both areas devolved to the Scottish Parliament. he Scottish Parliament is unable to make laws that o not comply with the human rights act, unlike westminster which can simply issue a notice of non compliance and get on with whatever it likes. From a civil rights perspective, the Scottish Parliament is already streets ahead of westminster. Armed police? I don’t know what part of Glasgow you are from, but i have yet to see a police man with a gun anywhere in town.

      • gregipoh

        “Queer resources are already majority funded by the Scottish Parliament
        as, largely, they are health based and local authority funded – both
        areas devolved to the Scottish Parliament”

        WHY are the numbers of gay youth suicides in Scotland still so horrendously huge?

      • MopMop

        I hope you’re actually just TRYING to misunderstand me and not being an actual idiot. OUR approach. As in, the amount of gayness in the opening ceremony. Obviously I would only be proud of it if there was something there to compare to, a reason for it to mean something, as in, the gayness considering THE Commonwealth approach. Honestly, did that really need to be explained to you?

        SNP promised we’d be the first in the UK to be able to wed. Originally, we were supposed to be able to by now. It’s all the way there, but still not quite. Scots cannot get married in Scotland today.

        The lottery funds LGBT programs in Scotland. Charities branches in the UK work together. General recourse from a world platform. I didn’t say of how much of all LGBT resources are from the UK, I never said how much we relied on it or even implied. Didn’t say that the Scottish government didn’t either. Again, I hope you’re actually trying to misunderstand me. It’s still crappy, but it’s better option that you being an idiot.

        Again, civil rights are not way ahead. The foundational opportunity may be there, but the practice isn’t. Westminster is actually currently criticising the Scottish government for their recent behaviour on such subjects. Again, appointed guardians, centralisation, armed police. Please tell me you actually pay attention to what’s happening in Scottish politics. Just google armed police in Scotland if you’re that unaware of it. It isn’t about how many there are. If you generally think civil rights doesn’t involve process and are protected because “ah it doesn’t matter, it’s only happening a few times” then I cannot have a conversation with you.

        • Charles Gormley

          I am not TRYING to misunderstand you, it didn’t take much effort. Perhaps that is why you feel so alone in your views? And seriously ‘i cant have a conversation with you?’. I will save you the bother of trying.

          • MopMop

            Oh yeah, to say I’m from Glasgow followed with being proud I was of “our approach” in relation to the opening ceremony obviously means I think that Commonwealth Countries homophobic attitudes are great. Clearly. I’m assuming you just like being a very small, nasty little man. Good for you.

            You’re a typical Yesser. Dismiss any criticisms, have a go at Westminster even though no one actually is defending them and say how everything in Scotland will be great – no one knows *how* exactly, just that it will.

            If you had said “You know what, yeah, there are some real problems with Scottish government and parliament and we will risk/lose this, this and this, but I genuinely believe with A, B and C we have a real shot of getting a better result.” But you just tried to insult and demean me, ignored all real issues and had a go at Westminster. And I’m supposed to think people like you are gonna be able to make a great, fair society? Not a chance in hell.

          • daveG

            All this does very well to illustrate my original point – nationalism is divisive, ends up with people who have key interests in common (like LGBTers) ending up scrapping.

            By the way Charles, I am from Liverpool, and also loathed Thatcher and all her works – so no apologies for them from me. I can’t think my life experience and aspirations are so different from a Glaswegian’s. Your apparent wish to dissociate yourself from, and lack of concern or solidarity with, my culture/city/life experience are troubling.

  • Silly Old Bastard

    Hmmm. Petty nationalism a champion of minority rights ? I wonder, if the outcome is Yes, how English gays living up there will fare.

    • Charles Gormley

      you are well named. The English are and will continue to be welcome here.

    • ItchycooMark

      wanting your country to make its own decisions, just like, France, Italy, Norway, Sweden and every other country in the world is not petty. My english boyfriend will also be voting yes, because after living up here he sees the bigger picture. The English gays will be fine

  • Edmund

    Vote Yes.

    The UK is full of great people, but it’s political and financial systems are rotten to the core. After ten more years in an England ruled by Westminster, how much of the NHS will be privatised, and how much will I be forced to pay for health insurance? How much more crowded will the commuter trains be? What fees will my niece and nephew be asked to pay for their education?

    Will even more jobs be concentrated in London? Will there be more 25% rises, putting the average house price up over a million pounds? Which normal person ever sees a million pounds in their lifetime?

    On the current trajectory the UK will be the most unequal society on the planet, with bankers buying million-pound one-bedroom flats while those of us without inheritances pay out all our wages in rent, in taxes, and in insurances to replace sold-off public services.

    Taxes won’t be cut one penny, despite the government having sold itself off, as they’ll need the cash to pay the interest on the debt and to fund weapons of mass destruction.

    I don’t want to live in a society that is run like this any more. In England, none of the other parties (save perhaps the Greens) are offering anything different. Scotland has a chance to change course. I hope they take it. Because if the doubters win then Scotland will become just another region of England, its best and brightest continuing to trickle away down south where the opportunities are.

  • █ █ █ €ώąɲ█ █ █

    Personally he should be apolitical.

    Also tell me does he know who Yes are funded by?

    Hint * The man behind an attempt to keep section 28 in Scotland

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