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Kate Middleton visits hotel owned by stone-the-gays Sultan of Brunei

  • Valksy

    Keep in mind that no bloody “royal” got there through merit – if you track back through history the crown passes hands by who is the biggest swine, who is the most willing to be a tyrant, and who has the most snivelling lapdogs or hired muscle to enable them. The crown is a sickening relic of “might makes right” and I would never show these bloody parasites once moment of “respect”. Frankly, basic civil courtesy would be a stretch.

    Does anyone expect them to be ally and friend? Goodness, why? What did they ever do to earn your loyalty or your friendship or your regards?

    For all I could care, their puke-making sultan chum, and all of them, can take their bloody polo mallets and shove them where the sun doesn’t shine. No one has EVER been harmed by my actions – I consider that my moral obligation. I won’t hold my breath.

    • Jesus_Mohammed

      Valksy, I have told you before, and I tell you now, I LOVE YOU!

    • PhillipSE5

      Hear Hear!

    • val

      When they arrive you can WET YOUR BLOODY PANTS

  • Leonard Woodrow

    Birds of a feather…!

    With certain people, opulence and wealth will always win out over moral issues.

    • Rehan

      Not just the opulent and rich – people cheerfully shop at Primark and Zara, fly on Emirates and holiday in Dubai (among many many other examples) despite well-documented human-rights abuses.

      • PhillipSE5

        I don’t shop at Primark, Peacocks, Zara, H&M & several other stores I know sell goods made by 3rd World sweatshop labour….
        I don’t fly on Emirates, & I don’t holiday in Dubai….. why on Earth would I want to holiday in such a tacky, ostentatious, vulgar part of the world which stands for everything I dislike, & everything which wreaks of “people who know the price of everything & the value of nothing”?
        I lead a rich, fulfilled, happy & creative life without doing any of the above.

        • Rehan

          I’m impressed, and I couldn’t agree with you more – down to the very phrase you use – about Dubai (though I admit I did stop off there once for 22 hours, just to see if it was as bad as I thought it’d be. It was, and more), but you must know you’re in a very, very small minority there.

          • PhillipSE5

            You could well be right there, that I’m in a small minority r.e. going out of my way to boycott products, services & countries with appalling human rights records, but that’s OK; A lot of my friends & some of my blood relations take similar stands about such things in life; e.g. my big sister, who would rather wear no makeup at all than wear products tested on animals or containing environmentally damaging palm oil; She’s very lucky to have cheekbones to die for; People still mistake her for her kids’ older sister (& she’s now in her early 50’s) so she doesn’t really need makeup to look great or feel confident, but that’s not the point; She has to make a real effort to source so-called beauty products, but she sees animal welfare & environmental issues as being her priority over easy access to ‘slap’. One Jewish friend never shops at Marks & Spencer; We’ve not yet discussed it, but I know he feels disgust at the way Israel treats Palestinian people; I’ve always suspected that’s the reason behind his decision.
            I’m in my 50’s, & over the years I’ve noticed how consumer boycotts really do have an effect r.e. all sorts of issues; The 1st gay civil rights related consumer boycott I became aware of was the boycott of Florida Orange Juice after one company used Anita Bryant to front it’s advertising campaign years ago; Ms Bryant made many homophobic remarks in the media at the time, & did her best to scotch any attempts to bring about employment rights for gay people (was it in California?) ……….
            I try my best to focus on the Phrase “As ye sew, so shall ye reap” in all aspects of my life. Although I’ve been a Buddhist now for 18 years, I was brought up in a traditional Methodist family home; I still very much like the phrase “Do as you would be done to.” We can ignore any religious roots for that phrase if we want to; I don’t think anyone can go too far wrong if they use that as a criteria for their choices in Life. As a Buddhist, I really do believe in Karma;
            “…the force that is produced by the things you do in your life and that will influence you in the future…”
            [For those of you who’re phobic about organised religion & philosophy {& I really do understand why on so many counts…} …Don’t worry, I’m not preaching; I’m only saying what’s important in MY Life………………

          • Rehan

            That’s very interesting, thank you Phillip; and once again, well done with your principled purchasing. At the risk of going off at a complete tangent, I have to say that awareness of Auschwitz/Srebrenica/Smyrna/Rwanda (etc etc) makes it very hard for me to believe in karma, though I think it’s an appealing idea.

            And as a pedant I must assume you meant “As ye sow …” – unless you’re a tailor, of course! :-)

  • Rehan

    This is the Mail being deliberately mischievous, I think – as it says in its own article On Friday, the 32-year-old Duchess used a blacked-out car to conceal her visit to the Dorchester Hotel in London’s Mayfair for the wedding of her cousin, Adam Middleton.

    Weddings like this these days are organised months, years in advance, what was she supposed to do, not go to a close relation’s celebration? The woman tried to be as discreet as possible, give her a break.

    • http://www.derekwilliams.net Derek Williams

      If a boycott has been announced because of human rights abuses, and
      anyone, whether a royal or not, breaks the boycott, then that is tacit
      endorsement of the regime that is responsible for human rights abuses.
      What’s worse in this case is that the Duchess tried to conceal it.

      • Valksy

        Thank you, Derek. Agree. And let’s be honest here – if any kind of activism was easy, if it required no effort, no cost of any kind, then everyone would do it.

        Is there actually an argument in saying – The boycott is good, unless it is uncomfy or inconvenient or hard….? Er. Wow.

        Over many years a LOT of us have faced uncomfy, inconvenient and hard because of who we are and what we have had to fight for. And what we fight for on behalf of our imperilled international sister and brotherhood. Should we have just given up?

        • PhillipSE5

          Hear Hear!

      • Rehan

        Do you think it’s worse? In an (uncharacteristically) charitable mood I would suggest she was just trying to avoid giving the event publicity as much as she could.

        • http://www.derekwilliams.net Derek Williams

          You can’t make this look good, sorry.

          • Rehan

            OK, but tell me this: an aged uncle and aunt of mine were in London last week: should I have refused to visit them at the Savoy, where they were staying, because it’s owned by the Saudi royal family (Shariah law has been established there – and implemented – for rather longer than in Brunei)? Or are only publicised boycotts a moral issue?

          • http://www.derekwilliams.net Derek Williams

            That’s a fair point, and I think more of these foreign owned businesses need to be called out, now that it’s become apparent.

            That said, I would still say yes, boycott. Unless my aunt and uncle were too disabled to come out of the hotel, I would invite them to another place to meet them and spend my money at a place that isn’t owned by an emirate who wants me stoned to death for loving my partner.

          • Rehan

            But you see that it’s not always easy, don’t you? To stick with my example, my uncle was hosting, and several other relations had come in from various parts of the UK; I couldn’t possibly have afforded to take them all elsewhere, or indeed host them at home instead. So yes, I went along – compromising myself in the process.

          • http://www.derekwilliams.net Derek Williams

            Obviously that’s an exceptional circumstance, and you’re not powerful enough to force the situation. That would only leave you the opportunity to discuss this with members of your family and maybe next time they’ll steer clear of such places, sumptuous though they might be.

            As for the Duchess, if she were in a comparable situation then her advisers should have foreseen this and tried to shift the event. If it was really so ‘last minute’as to be unshiftable, then a public statement should have been made declaring all that, specifically, deploring the regime’s abuse of human rights and declaring that the royals are dissociating themselves from further functions held not only there, but by all such barbaric regimes in future. That could be included in a speech at the actual event if they truly had the courage of their convictions.

            Instead they went ahead as though it was business as usual, and hid themselves in a darkened car – as though people wouldn’t notice!

            Like I said before, you can’t make this look good.

          • Rehan

            You’re right Derek, a public statement would have been a better attempt at damage limitation, although it’s also possible that such a thing would be hampered by the diplomatic reluctance of members of the family of one head of state to publicly criticise another. Look what recently happened with the PoW and Putin!

          • http://www.derekwilliams.net Derek Williams

            That’s right, but I agreed with what Prince Charles said and I was pleased to see he was largely supported by the British media, since it was what everyone was thinking anyway, and there is no law that forbids a royal from holding and expressing a privately held opinion.

            I enjoyed many of the Duke of Edinburgh’s so-called faux pas which he jocularly nicknamed ‘dontapedalogy’ for similar reasons.

          • Isa Kocher

            given her position she should have supported the boycott and send a big card saying so to the wedding.

          • http://www.speeddatingbytamara.com/ Helen Kalmar

            I understand why you went but hopefully you can stop them hosting another event at the Savoy by explaining why

          • PhillipSE5

            I wouldn’t have gone. I would have explained why. I turned down a wedding invitation to a cousin’s wedding years ago; I was well aware that I was only invited because his dreadful mother didn’t want to offend my parents; I told my parents that my cousin was “a homophobic bastard” who’d treated me very badly at a previous family occasion, & that I wouldn’t be seen dead at his wedding. That wasn’t easy for me to say, or for my very conventional parents to hear, but the fight for equal rights begins at home, always has done, always will do, as far as I’m concerned; I’m in my 50’s, so I go back to the time when many folks used to say that “the personal is political”; I still believe that myself, & I believe that very firmly.

          • Rehan

            It’s great that you stuck to your guns then but it’s not quite the same situation, is it? What if you actually liked your cousin? I don’t know if the duchess is particularly close to her cousin, but all the same she might not have wanted to pull out at such short notice.

          • PhillipSE5

            I think she could still have turned down the invite, & could have sent a lovely present along with a letter of explanation, then invited the happy couple out for a snack & a cuppa at her local branch of Gregg’s on their return from their honeymoon. That would certainly have added a personal & ‘common’ touch………

          • http://www.speeddatingbytamara.com/ Helen Kalmar

            I agree Derek, i would have suggested another venue and explained to your aunt and uncle why you chose not to meet them there. Word of mouth is very powerful and perhaps if you explained why they may have understood and it starts a conversation that is very important. They in turn will discuss with other people. I had no idea about the Savoy so thank you as planting one seed in someone’s head is a powerful tool of communication which I can now plant in someone else’s head and we can all keep that seed growing until it grows and the Savoy stop profiting.

          • PhillipSE5

            I agree with you, & if aunty & uncle weren’t able to travel far, I’d have paid for a taxi for them to travel in to meet me at another venue.

          • Rehan

            And the other 7 people whom they’d invited too?! It’s not always easy – or polite – to hijack someone else’s event, even within a family.

          • PhillipSE5

            How about a nice limousine (not one of those horrible, trashy ones kids hire for their 18th birthdays!) …a vintage Bentley or Roller….. I’d have arranged for it to turn up the day after the event to pick up everyone & take them to another venue…. somewhere classy, of course!

          • Isa Kocher

            certainly publicized boycotts concerning new implementations of hate law do make a big difference. i don’t know who owns what hotel. going into a hotel if there is no picket line and patronizing a hotel are also very different things.

          • Psychologist

            I agree Derek. This sends the WRONG message, where there was a clear opportunity to send the RIGHT one.

  • Jesus_Mohammed

    Middleton’s assignations are all thoroughly vetted. Her attendance at
    the Dorchester was carefully thought through. She has shown her
    colours. We take note. Up till now she and her parasite husband have
    had the benefit of the doubt, granted them by virtue of his mother’s
    rebelliousness and reaching out to the gay community. But now we know that although Middleton may have studied art
    at a university, she can’t think.

    Into the fire with the lot of them!

    • rapture

      She only went to that uni as she was programmed to stalk willie.

    • Stephen MOLE

      I can’t see what people see in her; I agree with Hilary Mantel, bland, bland, bland.

      • Suddenly Last Bummer

        What people see in her? Only one person needs to see something in her, the man she married. The days of a monarch picking a wife for child bearing or arm candy are over. What would you have her do to avoid being bland?

        • PhillipSE5

          She could hand back all her state benefits for a start, & she could get her husband to resign from the line of succession & the so-called ‘civil list’……….
          Then she could start to look for a job, & cope with all the pressures 99% of the population have to cope with, like paying for childcare & paying into a pension scheme, paying service bills, trying to find a decent state school for her kids………you name it…….
          She’s just a ruthless little gold digger………

      • PhillipSE5

        She’s the new “Brunette Barbie”

    • PhillipSE5

      Hear Hear!
      Make all the Saxe-Coburg-Gothes in the UK live on basic state benefit in a council flat on a sink estate in Peckham.
      They “know the price of everything & the value of nothing”!

  • Ra

    Such a shame this privileged woman choses to support the stoning of people. These royals have no regard for anyone but them selves. You are what you hangout with.

    • Truth

      Quite. Come the revolution – she will not be able to count on MY support!

  • Truth

    Monarchies of the world … unite! What possible relevance is it how long in advance this wedding might have been planned? I’ve no doubt KKK meetings are planned in advance. You don’t HAVE to attend. I note the self-haters are already defending her action …..

  • Carl

    What a dissapointment. She could have paid to move the wedding to another venue – or when has money been an issue for the Royals?

  • Paul J

    The Mail article states that Princes William and Harry played polo at Coworth Park, another hotel owned by the Sultan of Brunei. It’s nice to know that our “caring” Royals are so concerned about human rights.

    • gregipoh

      The Royal family, and the British ruling politicians have always been close with that Brunei family (oil $$$ money talks and buys friends- ask Tony Blair and Mandy); even after the UK gave Brunei its independence, the Sultan at that time asked the UK to leave our troops there, and in fact the UK put down a rebellion against him. Now the income from oil is running out, people there may feel that the sultan’s having the biggest palace in the world and a family of gambling womanisers, having non-Moslem tarts to do their stuff inside their separated world, isn’t too good. after all, what’s the difference between a guy stealing a motor bike and another, who through birth, can embezzle millions, no!- billions of $$$? Royalty in Islamic countries sucks- they NEVER follow Islam; they simply use it as a means of repression.

      Christian rulers did this in the past and the catholic church ruled by tyranny in places like south America, with its Inquisition and torture ; now it’s Islamic tyranny, as Christian power is limited to American evangelical Republicans, Filipino politicians and African dictators.

      There’s no dividing line between the sultan’s income and government revenues and he’s made himself chief of police and armed forces and of course of all Islamic religion in Brunei.

      He opted not to join all the other Malay states in a federation on independence, since he had all the oil money and didn’t want to share it with his Islamic brothers.

      So, as a means of control, he’s brought in all the repression of sharia laws.

      A ban on gambling, theft and on hiring prostitutes in the UK applying to his male relatives would bring far more pressure to bear than the Dorchester boycott. Of course, his family are, by his decree, all exempt from sharia law, so they can do as they please- gambling, prostitutes, booze and not paying their debts- these are the things his family are famous for in the UK, plus lengthy mega expensive civil court cases here related to theft and embezzlement. This is the sort of person who is going to have gays stoned, and OTHER thieves’ hand cut off, but not that of his cousin Jeffries, who stole millions, gambled, got drunk and womanised.

      In many ways, he brings Islam into far more disrepute than extremists in the UK and indeed anywhere, as do the Qatar lot- their guy who now owns 20% of Heathrow says residents shouldn’t be allowed to complain about noise from night flights keeping them awake; their airline bans staff from getting married, and they enslave foreign workers, taking passports and keeping them as slaves in appalling conditions, often not paying their wages. They use Islam as a means of enslaving their own people.

      Ironically, all this sort of monstrous exploitation and cruelty is NOT what Mohammed had in mind at all.

  • CHBrighton

    This woman sticks two fingers up to the rest of us and carries on living off our money. She’s obviously a real princes in the princess margaret tradition. But also, her family aren’t very sensitive are they? They should have changed the venue when they realised how unpleasant the owner is although to be fair on them, the Sultan is a good friend of prince charles.

    • Valksy

      It certainly isn’t hard to be a better person than Charles Windsor….

  • Joe McDougall

    Why is anyone surprised? The Commonwealth is littered with nations with atrocious regard to equality. Some monarchists fawn over vague noises made by the queen, despite these noises being non-committal and meaningless.

    I cannot fathom why people long to hang on to the “tradition” of this bizarre “born into privilege by the grace of god” tradition.

    • Thomas

      This story has certainly brought out all the bitter anti-monarchist trolls – if you don’t like living in our constitutional monarchy then get the hell out of the UK and go and live somewhere else!

      The wedding the Duchess attended was arranged long before the appalling Brunei legislation came to light – by boycotting a friend’s wedding she would have hurt her friend. If those advocating her boycott are prepared to treat their close friends in such a rude and spiteful fashion then you don’t deserve to have any friends!

      • PhillipSE5

        I bet your bookshelves are groaning under the weight of all your books about the so-called “Windsors”, & you shine & polish the tons of old ‘jubilee’ & royal wedding tat in your china cabinet every morning, don’t you dear?
        I love my country, & I wouldn’t live anywhere else, so don’t tell me (or anyone else, for that matter) to “get the hell out of the UK”, you silly old queen. I happen to believe that merit & honour & respect should be gained through hard work & dedication, & should not depend upon whose womb someone happened to have fallen out of at birth. Perhaps you’ve forgotten that we live in a democracy? If someone doesn’t believe in the monarchy, it is their right to hold those opinions & it is their right to express opinions, whether you like it or not.

        • Psychologist

          Absolutely correct !

      • http://www.bloketoys.co.uk/ BlokeToys.co.uk

        I wouldn’t have any friends who would be willing to disregard the Human Rights of others for an evening of champagne swilling in unnecessary opulence.

        I think we need to admit that this is a class issue. Some are so selfish and privileged that they don’t have any clue of the real suffering going on in this world, and if they are even remotely aware they’re too easily blinded by the sparkling of crystal chandeliers to actually give a damn.

        It’s rare to see someone in such circles who actually DOES get it, but then that’s why Diana was so loved and supported by millions of people in a way that no other Royal has been before or since.

        • PhillipSE5

          Hear Hear!

        • Psychologist

          Totally agree !

  • lit per

    She has a gay brother. That’s the lowest of low!

    • PhillipSE5

      He’s not gay, he’s just sensitive, & he hasn’t found the right girl yet! Heh heh heh heh heh!

  • doug

    ‘….used a blacked-out car.’ Should have been a tumbril.

    • Gareth

      Haha! That gave me the biggest laugh. Thank you Doug.

      • p

        Thought he was dating Donna Air? Then again beard springs to mind!!!

  • Psychologist

    Very disappointing ! The argument some are making here, that “it was organised in advance”, simply is NOT an excuse for NOT supporting human rights.
    Would William’s mother (princess Diana) have supported the hotel/sultan instead of human rights ? I doubt it !
    This sends the wrong message entirely ! Plus a missed opportunity to send the RIGHT message !

    • rapture

      Agreed, there is no defence for those who use these hotels and those that attempt to lack empathy to the suffering of others.
      If people who book these venues and be extravagant with their money to keep up their social image, then they can afford to lose the deposit or better demand it back.

      • Psychologist

        Absolutely agree !
        Surely, human rights must have a much higher priority than a “posh lavish event” ?

  • rapture

    The royal family are putrid. They live like parasites off our taxes and offer nothing in return .
    The queen’s commonwealth speech was obvious in it’s omission of LGBT.
    It is already established how little the royals care for us plebs and their appeasement of tyrants and homophobia.
    This primitive , barbaric brunei law also affects women and others. I’m sure if this was the case of boycotting a sudanese hotel , they would oblige because of the media coverage of the controversial Meriam Ibrahim situation.
    Kate middleton is nothing but a social climbing , poor emulation of Diana and she has no respect/regard for those who are being murdered under these vile human rights abuses.
    Harry is just a Nazi uniform wearing playboy, ironic that his daddy should call putin out on being like hitler, although it was probably the best thing he ever did.

    • PhillipSE5

      I agree with you all the way…..

    • Jordy

      She has joined the family of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Schleswig-Holstein Glucksburg…Windsor indeed, wonder what Elizabeth the first would have to say about this tribe.

  • John

    plenty of Gay people get work from him…i work in the Dorchester Hotel so think before you print……

    • kane

      so the job prospects of london’s gays are more important then lives of gays in brunei ?

    • PhillipSE5

      perhaps you need to start looking around for somewhere else to work?

    • lit per

      I think you need to be stoned to death!

    • http://www.bloketoys.co.uk/ BlokeToys.co.uk

      I think you need to look for another job.
      I wouldn’t be able to walk into one of these hotels as a guest without seeing mental images of innocent people being slaughtered by baying mobs of religious nutters, so working there would be impossible for me.

      I simply don’t understand how any decent person can continue to be in these hotels without feeling immeasurable guilt for supporting a family who would slit your throat based on their religious delusions.

    • http://www.speeddatingbytamara.com/ Helen Kalmar

      And do they know you are gay. If not, what would happen if they found out and if they do know why are you still working there

  • lee

    how sad she went there

  • David Greensmith

    Well, let’s face it. She’s in good company. Her grandmother in law likes rubbing shoulders with despots and dictators – even inviting tyrants to her birthday bash. Remember that you’re dealing with a group of people – and their supporters – who believe that people born into royalty are somehow magically superior to the rest of us. If you’re looking to them as role models, perhaps that’s part of the problem.

    • kane

      ‘…Her mother in law likes rubbing shoulders with despots and dictators…’

      who? camilla?

      • David Greensmith

        I realised my typo after I’d hit “post” – updated it to read “grandmother”. That would be Queen Elizabeth who invited Arab dictators to her birthday bash and is head of the Commonwealth – an organisation of 52 nations that claims to uphold a common set of beliefs in human rights and in 40 of which is it illegal to be gay.

    • PhillipSE5

      True!

  • Daniel

    So an over-privileged benefits scrounger has attended a wedding at a boycotted hotel. Given that this lot stick together, hardly surprising really.

  • kane

    is she any worse then the gay charity stonewall?

    • PhillipSE5

      No, she’s just as bad as stonewall in this respect

      • kane

        really? how can we criticise her when gay organization that supposed to campaign for gay equality disagrees with the boycott

        • PhillipSE5

          I didn’t vote for Stonewall to represent me….. & indeed they don’t represent me……… you can only be a member of Stonewall if you are a so-called ‘celebrity’……..
          I have always been very critical of Stonewall, & I also believe Katherine Middleton-Windsor should not have gone to the wedding.
          I think you ‘hit the nail on the head’ when you said that Stonewall are “supposed” to campaign for gay equality.

          • kane

            its irrelevant whether stonewall represent you or not. stonewall is a high profile gay organization and its opposition to boycott gives, by default, credibility to people like kate

          • PhillipSE5

            ….no, it doesn’t…….. Most people know that Stonewall are just an elitist group of tired old ‘celebrities’ who are overpaid & underworked.

          • kane

            only most of lgbt people realise that ‘Stonewall are just an elitist group of tired old ‘celebrities’ who are overpaid & underworked’

            most of general public regard stonewall to be gay organisation fighting for gay rights and if gay organisation oppose boycott then why should general public criticise kate?

          • PhillipSE5

            …well, the joy of living in a democracy is that we’re entitled to have the discussion we’re having here (without fear of harassment, imprisonment, torture or execution, unlike what happens to people in some parts of the world) ….it’s up to us to make sure we have similar discussions with our LGBT friends & our LGBT-friendly friends……. it’s a gradual process, but the more people who realise the truth about Stonewall the better…. And we can also write to newspapers of every political flavour, in the hope that they’ll publish our letters; We lost an elderly gay friend last Summer; He was 80; He started campaigning for gay equal rights in the 1950’s by writing to The Times regularly; I take inspiration from him; That was a brave thing for him to do at a time when it was illegal to be gay; To use an old phrase: “Out of tiny acorns mighty oak trees grow.”

  • Chris B

    Much as I deplore Brunei’s policies and support the Dorchester boycott, some of the poisonous comments on here take some swallowing. I guarantee that not ONE of us has a home entirely free from products from countries with an appalling human rights record or has services provided solely by gay-friendly countries.

    • ChocoBetty

      I agreed about the products and services – although I try to avoid companies where I know that they wouldn’t accept me at times when I’m with a women. (It’s always complicated if you don’t walk the straight line but aren’t truly on “the other side”.)

      I avoid them because I don’t want to support a company financially that doesn’t accept me the way I am. I get the point that got mentioned in other replies about gay emloyees – but then I would also never want to work for a company that hates me for being me. At the same time I see that these people were employed there (no matter who is the employer) maybe for years and I know how hard it is to find a job these days. In Germany you are protected by the law – but then the law can’t really protect you from bullying, it can only punish the people that have hurt you. And that usually happens when the damage is already done.

      I think it is hard to be in the spotlight – because no matter what you do people will judge you. What would have happened if she hadn’t been at that wedding? The press would have probably just picked the fact that she wasn’t there and complained that she doesn’t care about her family and family values. You can twist and turn this whole story as much as you want to but in the end no matter what Kate did the press would have made her look bad because that sells the newspapers. (Apart from the fact that as a member of the royal family she is someone who sells the papers when her face is on the cover…)

      • PhillipSE5

        If she’d chosen not to go to the wedding she could have explained why to the press……….
        Some of the executions of queer people in the middle east have involved them being pushed off cliffs, hanged, buried up to their chin in sand then stoned to death…….
        Human rights are so much more important than some overprivileged hooray henrietta insisting on going to a wedding in spite of the circumstances.

        • Rehan

          Though of course Brunei is not even remotely in the Middle East. The boycotts of the UK business interests of the actual Middle Eastern regimes, eg Saudi, that do actually implement Sharia law appear to be somewhat thin on the ground.

          • PhillipSE5

            ….Oh, sure, I’d be the 1st to admit I need to get my atlas out more often……. & will do ASAP……….. & yes, boycotts of UK business interests of Middle Eastern regimes are indeed thin on the ground…… perhaps we have to implement our own, if we choose to do so, of course……… boycotts of South African goods during the Apartheid regime were thin on the ground, too, but many of us refused to buy them nevertheless…… The Man from Delmonte was definitely sent to Coventry for many years in my house…….

    • PhillipSE5

      She’s a public figure with a massive media profile who receive tons of public money for merely existing, being driven around by a chauffeur, smiling winsomely & living rent free in palaces; Whatever she does, & whichever businesses she supports by her presence has far, far greater significance than whether an ordinary member of the public happens to go to Primark occasionally.

  • JGatsby

    Get a grip, she went to a wedding people! Stop twisting and reading into everything people in the public eye do, so what if the Hotel is owned by a oaf (add further explicits of your own choice). Kate Middleton has in no way supported his activities, she went to support her aunt get married and my personal view is that family comes first. People really need to stop being outraged for the sake of being outraged!

    • PhillipSE5

      Why should family always “come first”?
      Surely Human Rights should be much higher in the list of priorities for any civilized human being?

      • JGatsby

        Otherwise you will be a very lonely human being. Its admirable that you value other peoples problems above yourself but at the end of that day, if you’ve got no one to share them with the whats the point. So yes, I value my family and friends above all else, even your human rights.

        • PhillipSE5

          I manage to integrate family, friendship & principles in my life very well; None of my friends would choose to hold any kind of function in a venue owned by someone who advocates murdering LGBT people in another part of the world. You obviously don’t have friends & relations who respect your principles; You obviously don’t give a damn about LGBT people if they don’t live in the UK. You obviously live your life simply to please the other people around you. I feel sorry for you. That’s no way to live.

          • JGatsby

            Good for you and I’m sure you do it spectacularly as well. You clearly have the greatest friends in the world and you completely hold the moral high ground, wouldn’t it be better though if your friends didnt want to hold a function which is owned by someone who advocates murder in general. not just the LGBT? Funereally enough I do care, however what I dont care about are tiny, pathetic little things like this, do you think the Sultan gives a toss if shes donsnt go? Nope. I support actions which make a difference, no point wasting time and energy, economic sanctions for instance. Awww, thanks, its so nice to have someones pity, I feel so special all of a sudden ;) but your completely right, having a loyal group of friends and family surrounding you is just plain terrible, no body wants that

          • PhillipSE5

            What a nasty, bitter, twisted, self-hating, sad old queen you are!
            And so many of your above sentences don’t actually make any sense whatsoever. You should try rereading them!
            You go away now & polish your collection of Jubilee mugs, & carry on with your sad, hateful life…………. & yes, I still feel sorry for you, & I’m sure you absolutely hate that, don’t you?
            Unlike you, some of us have morals & principles, & do our best to act on them. I don’t give a tinker’s cuss if that sets off an angry, crazy reaction in you.
            There is plenty of evidence that consumer boycotts have worked in the past, including on gay human rights issues. It’s out there online for the world to see, whether you choose to ignore it or not..
            Is your bitterness due to sexual frustration?

          • JGatsby

            Hmm, I kinda wish I was a drag queen, they are just so sassy but sadly the old part doesn’t ring true, 18 here :)
            and yet u manged to respond….
            Whats wrong with liking the monarchy? dose not mean im a fanatic, just a supporter. Know the difference please, ty. Why would I hate you….I dont know you and so what if we disagree, if we all hated someone who disagreed with us no one would talk to one-another.
            Everyone has morals and principle, just people have different morals and principles which they live by, like I believe eating meat is a good thing whereas a vegetarian dosnt. Both are right but both are different :) You seem to be the one reacting slightly crazy my friend.
            I never disagreed with you on that, however the Dorchester is not a place most people go as most people cant afford it, so yes boycott away but the rich will still go there as its a nice hotel :) Personally, when ive stayed there, it was a really nice place, well worth a stay if can afford it, the staff are lovely and the food even better ahha x
            Umm, my sex life is fine thanks, I didnt realize it was conducive towards the conversation though? Im sure you get all the boys from Grindr :)

  • Martin R

    In all fairness Kate may have been unaware of the boycott, or even the reasons for it. Let’s give the lady the benefit of doubt (this time).

    • PhillipSE5

      I’ll send her a postcard, shall I, just to make sure she knows?
      If she doesn’t know, then she ought to know; The Saxe-Coburg-Gothas in this country have teams of secretaries & all sorts of badly paid people working for them who are supposed to keep them abreast of all such controversial issues.

  • Steven Gregory

    If there’s plenty of noise, I suspect she and other royals will avoid the situation at all costs. And that is part of the goal of the boycotts, that the Sultan becomes a social pariah.

  • Jose Soto

    I am beginning to think that Brunei is nothing but a puppet state of the UK just like Uganda.

    Where there is British influence for some reason you will find reactionary backwards oppressive hostile environments. Is this some sick British joke?

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