A same-sex marriage bill has been defeated on the Faroe Islands.

In a second reading vote on Thursday 13 March, 20 lawmakers voted against the legislation, while only 11 voted in favour.

The Faroe Islands, made up of around 50,000 people, is currently the only Nordic country without civil partnerships or equal marriage, and there are no laws allowing adoption or artificial insemination for same-sex couples.

A poll published in May last year found that 72% of women and 65% of men on the Faroe Islands said they supported equal marriage.

The poll also showed that 68% said they favoured civil marriage for same-sex couples, meaning in town or city halls, but not in churches or religious organisations, with 27% against and 5% undecided.

Laws against homophobic discrimination in employment were introduced by the country’s government in 2006.