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Welsh First Minister: I was told speaking out against Uganda’s anti-gay laws could make things worse

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  1. Colin (Queenstown/London) 13 Jan, 6:10pm

    I don’t see how he could have made it worse.

    A gentle speech taking Uganda through the recent history from influential sexual studies of people and animals, decriminalising around the globe in more educated countries, from human rights arguments up to today where gay people are meeting, sharing their lives openly and bringing up families. Also saying that the religious stance is wrong.

    I’m sorry I believe in the human race and it’s ability to do good. The ordinary people of Uganda would listen. Yes the church and those vocal who are anti will shout but local people know how disgusting they are. A tiny % ruling the majority. And the coe and catholic mab say nothing. They are complicit in the deaths that follow. They are the main churches in Africa and say nothing. I’ll never understand it. I can see no good in these rich powerful palaces and people die. Silence should condemn the church and all it stands for.

    A lost opportunity. Sad indeed.

    1. It’s bad for business. Simples!

  2. jackAlison 13 Jan, 6:13pm

    diplomatic jargon 4 “I sat on my hands n did nuffn.” Wot a coward. and I dont beleive 4 1 minute he disgussed gay issues privately….since when is speakin out a private affair?

  3. BlokeToys 13 Jan, 6:13pm

    How on Earth could he have made things worse by speaking out against it?

    The truth is, this is yet more bullsh*t from spineless politicians who say one thing to one audience and another to the next, depending on how slimy they need to be.

    He’s a fu**ing COWARD, just like almost every other turd in a suit in every government office around the world.

    1. “How on Earth could he have made things worse by speaking out against it?”

      By associating the bill with standing up to a not-necessarily-popular foreign power? Since popular opinion in Uganda is in support of the bill, raising its profile is only going to put more pressure on the president to sign it anyway.

      1. wales…. not-necessarily-popular foreign power. really???

      2. wales…. not-necessarily-popular foreign power. really

  4. Carl Rowlands 13 Jan, 6:15pm

    siomedig iawn (very disappointing)

  5. Helen Kalmár 13 Jan, 6:34pm

    there needs to be a worldwide boycott to Uganda

  6. Steve_R 13 Jan, 6:47pm

    Another misleading headline! despite all the “quotes” and headlines in this article one had to read almost to the end to learn Mr. Jones, did in fact speak out!

    If Mr. Jones, voiced concerns and disapproval with Uganda continuing to persecute LGBT with this Bill, surely he should be commended not criticized.

    Frank Mugishu, Ugandan LGBT activist has repeatedly stated in interviews the importance of continued and constructive dialogue is vital to prevent this Bill becoming law. He has repeatedly said outsiders must understand that in supporting LGBT, we must careful not to provoke politicians or Ugandan’s who are politically using “Look what the gays are doing to Uganda” to win support and intolerance against gays.

    Like many I feel sanctions should be imposed and business curtailed, I don’t how ever wish to see any one a martyr. We need to heed warnings to proceed with wisdom and caution, exercise discretion so we don’t provoke retaliation and retribution on LGBT living in Uganda.

    1. jackAlison 13 Jan, 7:35pm

      its NOT misleading
      “I spoke publicly about the need for tolerance and acceptance and discussed the Anti-Homosexuality Bill privately”
      Its a paradox in terms
      I speak publicly about prejudice but I can only name it privately???
      what a hypocrite
      he could have discussed the toilet paper print he wiped his sensitive welsh arse on 4 all we know or care? anova bloated white middlewclass do goodr male polly.
      wot a fraud

    2. jackAlison 13 Jan, 7:47pm

      its NOT misleading
      “I spoke publicly about the need for tolerance and acceptance and discussed the Anti-Homosexuality Bill privately
      Its a paradox in terms
      I speak publicly about prejudice but I can only name it privately???
      what a hypocrite
      he could have discussed the toilet paper print he wiped his sensitive welsh arse on 4 all we know or care? anova bloated white middlewclass do goodr male polly.
      wot a fraud

    3. ‘…Another misleading headline! despite all the “quotes” and headlines in this article one had to read almost to the end to learn Mr. Jones, did in fact speak out!..’

      so far we have dont have any proof that he did

      1. Steve_R 14 Jan, 3:13am

        The gentleman did say he spoke “privately”, and I did say “IF” >”If Mr. Jones, voiced concerns and disapproval with Uganda continuing to persecute LGBT with this Bill, surely he should be commended not criticized”

        I would prefer to take the man at his word rather than “speculate” he did not” because on the flip side of the lack of proof… there is an apparent lack of proof he did/did not!

        Further, in view of the fact of his knowledge of the precarious danger of speaking publicly, we are not privy to any protocol he had to abide to from Downing St.

        There would be no reason to doubt any claim to have spoken out if he had not been vague on the nature of dialogue exchanged… even if not who with.

  7. Did the taxpayer pay for this visit? If we did. I want my money back.

    1. roderious 13 Jan, 6:59pm

      Of course, who else? oh and while he was there he promised to send more money to Uganda more money (over and above any international aid from the UK government).

  8. roderious 13 Jan, 7:00pm

    Jones didn’t simply ‘not speak out’ his very presence at this sensitive time will be taken as a show of support for the Ugandan government. In fact having given no details about his ‘private discussions’ how do we know he didn’t simply say ‘good on you, I wish I could do the same in my country but need to bite my tongue.’

  9. Not speaking out is the only thing guaranteed to do harm.

  10. Ukphill 13 Jan, 7:39pm

    The headline reminded me of a famous quote:

    First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out– Because I was not a Socialist.

    Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out– Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

    Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out– Because I was not a Jew.

    Then they came for me–and there was no one left to speak for me.

    ……we can’t tell from this article what was actually said…..but I feel profoundly disappointed by the suggestion that it may make things worse.

  11. improving lives of poor and disadvantaged people in 3rd world is always good thing but keeping silence in public about state prosecution of minorities is never a good thing. shame on him

  12. Probably more interested in the free first class air ticket and five star hotel accommodation.

  13. Aryugaetu 13 Jan, 9:04pm

    Silence is compliance.
    If you do nothing, if you say nothing, are you not as guilty as those doing harm around you?
    I do not wear rainbow flags to proclaim I am Gay; I wear it for those who cannot wear the rainbow flag, to let them know they are not alone. I do not need rainbow patches and stickers to feel pride, just the knowledge I made someone smile, I gave someone hope for however brief in their darkened world, is payment enough for me. Most people don’t need Superman. They just need you. Don’t remain silent. Stand up and protect those weaker than yourself.

    1. Jon (Malaysia) 14 Jan, 2:41am

      Brilliantly stated! I am often amazed at how accepting people are of me in this country with its incredibly backwards government at the grassroots level. Even very religious muslims often at least give me a listen. It’s not so difficult being an ambassador for gays if one isn’t confrontational. Even when people don’t agree with me, they often go away liking me. How do I know? They voluntarily call me later to go for coffee and more talk:)

  14. Dewi Evans 13 Jan, 9:46pm

    I wonder if the first minister is familiar with this quote

    ” First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out– Because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out– Because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out– Because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me–and there was no one left to speak for me.”

    If people do not speak out against things that they see as wrong then we will end up in a much poorer world.

    I am proud to be Welsh however I am ashamed of our First Minister for saying nothing.

  15. Spineless overpaid wanker – I suppose speaking out about female genital mutilation or modern slavery could make ‘things’ worse too?

    Publicity seeking MPs are just pathetic examples of humanity!

  16. Cardiff 15 Jan, 12:45am

    what a massive disappointment. He could have postponed his trip, but chose to go and risk the impression that nothing at all will change. This horrific law that would imprison gay people for life will only ever be challenged by international pressure.

  17. Caradog Thomas 16 Jan, 6:31pm

    How come we’ve got money to throw away with a trip to Uganda but no money for flood defences in Aberystwyth. It just doesn’t add up. What is going on

  18. Observer 16 Jan, 10:24pm

    If a First Minister cannot be trusted to speak his own mind, what possible use is he? Other than to give silence as support to a viscous, cruel, inexplicably nasty law.

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