Over 100 demonstrators gathered outside London’s High Commission of India last week to campaign against the Indian Supreme Court’s decision to reinstate a ban on gay sex.

In December, the Supreme Court in India ruled to reinstate Section 377 of the penal code, which bans gay sex. LGBT campaigners in India and around the world reacted with shock at the ruling.

The event, which took place on Wednesday, was attended by over 100 activists, half of them Indian or African.

In promotion of the demonstration, Human rights activist Peter Tatchell said: “This rally is in solidarity with LGBT Indians and their straight allies. We are urging the Indian Parliament to repeal section 377 of the Indian penal code. Late last year, the Supreme Court of India recriminalised homosexuality,

“Chapter XVI, Section 377, of the Indian Penal Code dates back to 1861. Imposed by the British during the colonial rule of India, it criminalises sexual activities ‘against the order of nature,’ including same-sex acts. It is a relic of colonialism, not an authentic indigenous law.

“Section 377 was declared unconstitutional with respect to sex between consenting adults by the High Court of Delhi on 2 July 2009. This judgement was overturned by the Supreme Court of India on 11 December 2013, with the Court ruling that amending or repealing Section 377 should be a matter left to parliament, not the judiciary.”

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He added: “It is not an authentic Indian law. Prior to British colonial occupation, this anti-gay law did not exist. Indeed, some Indian temples celebrate same-sex love.

“Section 377 violates the non-discrimination principles of the Indian constitution, the Commonwealth Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which India has signed and pledge to uphold.

“LGBT people in India have urged international solidarity and many Indian people in the UK – gay and straight – support the protest and the campaign to repeal section 377.”

Last month also saw the London Day of Rage take place in London against Section 377.

The Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has said he is “personally saddened” that India’s Supreme Court has reinstated the ban.

Dr Purna Sen, former Head of Human Rights at the Commonwealth Secretariat and chair of the Kaleidoscope Trust, said: “The Supreme Court’s ruling is a terrible setback for the struggle to secure equal rights for LGBT people, not just in India, but in many of the Commonwealth countries that still enforce colonial era restrictions on the liberties of LGBT people.”