A gay retired British banker charged with possessing a video depicting a sexual act fears the passing of Uganda’s Anti Homosexuality Bill could create even greater danger for him.

Bernard Randall, 65, from Kent, said the bill passed last week by the Ugandan Parliament could inflame “the passions of the more bigoted”.

He said to the Press Association: “[The] development is of great concern because it inflames the passions of the more bigoted and lends legitimacy to vigilante action.

“I can foresee more David Kato-type killings, and I do not want to be one of them.

“My situation can only get worse.”

LGBT rights campaigner David kato was murdered in Uganda in January 2011, having been outed by the country’s Rolling Stone magazine.

Mr Randall was arrested in October and charged with “trafficking obscene publications”. Uganda’s Red Pepper newspaper had published details of his private life on its front page via video.

Mr Randell claims the film was unearthed by robbers who stole his laptop and passed the footage to the newspaper.

He is due back in court on 22 January and faces a possible two-year prison sentence if found guilty.

Mr Randall denies the charges.

Proceedings in the Ugandan city of Entebbe have repeatedly been delayed.

It had been suggested that Mr Randall might be deported before the case goes to trial, but he does not believe that will now happen.

“I was assured by both the resident state attorney in Entebbe and by the immigration commissioner for inspection and legal affairs that I would not be deported whilst the cases were ongoing, and that if the case against me was dropped or that I was found not guilty then I would be free to leave in the normal way,” he added.

“I would only be deported if I was found guilty. Time will tell.”

Mr Randall was charged alongside his friend Albert Cheptoyek, 30, a Ugandan national with whom he shares a house.

Mr Cheptoyek has denied a more serious charge of carrying out “acts of gross indecency”, which could see him jailed for up to seven years if found guilty.

On Friday, the UK Government condemned the Ugandan Parliament for passing its Anti-Homosexuality Bill.

MPs in Uganda passed legislation to toughen the punishment for same-sex sexual activity, including life imprisonment for all same-sex sexual behaviour – not just the current life tariff for anal intercourse. 

The bill increases the penalty for other acts – including mere sexual touching – from seven years to life imprisonment.

Promoting homosexuality and aiding and abetting others to commit same-sex acts will be punishable by five to seven years in jail.

A person in authority – gay or heterosexual – who fails to report violators to the police within 24 hours will be sentenced to three years behind bars.

Campaigners are calling on Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni not to sign the bill into law.