Bisexual singer and songwriter Sia has decided to donate all proceeds from her recent collaboration with Eminem to an LGBT charity, after Eminem’s latest single “Rap God” was criticised recently for containing several lines of aggressive, homophobic lyrics.

The 37-year-old joined vocals with the rapper on the song “Beautiful Pain” for his album, The Marshall Mathers LP 2, but said she is now planning to donate all proceeds to the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center.

She argued that Eminem’s Slim Shady character represented the “worst and darkest bile of America,” but the man behind him is in no way homophobic.

She said: “I am queer, and I love my queers, young and old. I work with the Center and homeless LGBT kids, and when I heard Rap God I was very anxious.”

However, in a discussion with Huffington Post contributor DJ Keo Nozari on Twitter, she added: “I know personally that he is not homophobic, but a performance artist. I would never work with someone I believed to be homophobic.

“I respect that he can be misinterpreted in the worst way by the ignorami (sic), and that scares me, but I respect him as an artist and person.”

In a similar vein, Eminem also defended his single recently, saying of his Slim Shady persona: “I think people know my personal stance on things and the personas that I create in my music.”

The first verse of the song contains lyrics about breaking “a mother******* table over the back of a couple faggots and crack it in half,” and, “You fags think it’s all a game.”

The second verse continues: “Little gay-looking boy / So gay I can barely say it with a straight face-looking boy / You witnessing massacre like you watching a church gathering taking place-looking boy / ‘Oy vey, that boy’s gay,’ that’s all they say looking-boy.”

Eminem also addressed his use of the word “faggot,” saying “it was more like calling someone a bitch or a punk or asshole.”

In June, Eminem came out in support of same-sex marriage, saying: “I think if two people love each other, then what the hell? I think that everyone should have the chance to be equally miserable, if they want.