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Lord Tebbit blasted by Lib Dem MP for saying a pardon for Alan Turing would set ‘dangerous precedent’

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  1. Patrick C Notchtree 1 Nov 2013, 5:10pm

    It’s a shame Gordon Brown didn’t go the whole way and get HM to issue a full pardon. Perhaps enough MPs will have the balls (including the female ones) to get this bill through and right this shameful wrong.

  2. Marcwebbo3 1 Nov 2013, 5:22pm

    Tebbit is such a vile nasty man that any positive moves in favour of LGBT people he would be against….he needs to remember that sadly his life and bigots like him were saved by Turings work

    1. “could be used to “posthumously convict men of crimes for acts that were not criminal when they were committed, but would be if they were committed today”.

      I can’t think of any crimes that would be illegal today that weren’t in the past, other than destroying the manufacturing base of an entire country for political expediency?
      Can we make that illegal today or yesterday? No? Oh! In that case you are safe then Mr Tebbit.

      I usually abhor the sort of comment that says “can’t wait until you are dead” but when the person concerned is so bitter and vile and suppurating………………………………..

  3. Scott Rose 1 Nov 2013, 5:38pm

    Lord Tebbit is a jackass.

  4. Tim Hanafin 1 Nov 2013, 6:11pm

    Isn’t he dead yet?

  5. While I wholeheartedly support a pardon for Alan Turing, surely every man wrongly convicted of homosexuality should be pardoned – posthumously or otherwise. It’s a travesty that it was ever a crime in the first place, but to only pardon a few “celebrity” gays almost makes it worse.

    1. Hear, hear.

    2. I agree with your sentiment but I think the point here is that a pardon is given precisely under special circumstances. It is not an admittance that the law was wrong (which it was), but is an act of generosity for a reason (sometimes corrupt reasons as when an American president retires and pardons all his locked up cronies).
      The move to pardon Alan Turing is based on the fact that at the time of his persecution (which was wrong although legal) and his trial and conviction, no one knew about what he had done for this country as it was all still top secret due to the cold war.
      The move to pardon him was more about honouring him for what he did for this country and in itself would be a great move to right wrongs about the way gay people were treated in the past.
      It would be a symbolic gesture of reconciliation and would not put right what was done to him or any of the other victims of those laws.

  6. Mr. Norman Tebbit’s “logic” is unbelievably twisted and one can only assume the motive for this latest argument, this latest manifestation of twisted thinking, is his hatred of homosexual people. Norman needs treatment.

    On

    1. Robert in S. Kensington 1 Nov 2013, 6:36pm

      I wish he would drop dead and take his equally loony freak of a wife with him.

      1. Really? How intriguing, Robert! Please tell more of his loony spouse. (I suppose I shouldn’t be so surprised! As has been implied regarding couples in a certain Court this week, what one thinks, the other usually thinks.)

    2. soapbubblequeen 3 Nov 2013, 6:07pm

      They don’t call him Norman “Psycho” TeBates for nothing!

  7. Robert in S. Kensington 1 Nov 2013, 6:35pm

    I wish this vile fossil and pathetic excuse of a demented loon would do humanity a huge favour and leave it permanently.

  8. That There Other David 1 Nov 2013, 6:48pm

    There should be no pardon for Alan Turing. Instead every single one of these historical indecency convictions should be completely and totally quashed.

    Tebbit, meanwhile, is irrelevant. Nobody listens to him these days. He’d probably get turned away from BNP rallies.

  9. Ask Tebbit hows his German language skills – !!!! Without Turing Tebbit would now be speaking German. I can’t insult the intelligence of one as old as Tebbit is, but I am so close to it. Note to self. He’s old, he’s old, he is old.

    1. Robert in S. Kensington 2 Nov 2013, 11:22am

      Another reason why life peerages should be abolished entirely, in fact the entire upper chamber. I just can’t get my head around an unelected body of people getting a say in making laws affecting our lives sometimes adversely. I wish we had the New Zealand system of an fully elected unicameral chamber. Much more modern and relevant.

  10. Mumbo Jumbo 1 Nov 2013, 8:07pm

    It is almost funny to see that a sad, bitter, second-rate has-been politician like Tebbit who has contributed nothing to anything except the furtherance of stupidity and bigotry thinks himself fit to comment on a giant like Alan Turing.

  11. A pardon =/= a conviction.

  12. Christopher in Canada 1 Nov 2013, 9:54pm

    So… by his logic, a man molesting a woman without her consent in the 60’s would now have to stand trial for it… hmmm…

  13. Lord Tebbit being a poisonous old fart. Not exactly what one would call news!

  14. James Campbell 1 Nov 2013, 11:52pm

    Ever since I learned about Turing’s genius (and the way he was treated) I have been forever thankful that he lived to make a major contribution to our survival – a survival that people such as Tebbit has shared in. I remember the ignorant nonsense that this spiteful man spouted during the debate on the Gender Recognition Bill in 2004. Tebbit is long past his sell-by date and should make way for someone who does not drag his opinions out of the murky depths of ill-informed prejudice.

    1. Robert in S. Kensington 2 Nov 2013, 11:26am

      Another reason why life peerages should be abolished entirely, in fact the entire upper chamber. I just can’t get my head around an unelected body of people getting a say in making laws affecting our lives sometimes adversely. I wish we had the New Zealand system of an fully elected unicameral chamber. Much more modern and relevant.

  15. Tebbit’s bid for the title of Most Odious Man Alive is going well.

  16. Jock S. Trap 2 Nov 2013, 11:04am

    Again Tebbit is wrong, nasty and supports the Bigoted regime of the 1950’s.

    Saying that I believe even Churchill felt the way Alan Turing was treated was wrong and he was wrong for not speaking out, even if the law was different then.

    That makes Tebbit even worse that the old regime and ever more a man of irrelevance.

    The fact that Tebbit feels Mr Turing helping save this country means nothing says more about him. He constantly shows why the Lords needs to be changed to an elected house.

  17. This is the same Tebbit and his wife who said…

    “He said: “I always had my worries about Jimmy, because he was a very odd fellow…. I would not have been surprised to find he was having homosexual relationships with young people.”

    When his interviewer clarified that Savile was not homosexual, Lord Tebbit conceded: ”Not in general, no, as I understand it.”

    “But he had a homosexual air about him,” added Lady Tebbit.” Pink News 15th June 2013

    Of course Savile wasn’t gay, but he did spend many a Christmas with Thatcher at Chequers so has more than a Conservative air about him. Tebbit and his wife are true poison.

  18. NickDavisGB 2 Nov 2013, 5:54pm

    He’ll be dead soon and we can have another party.

    1. soapbubblequeen 3 Nov 2013, 6:06pm

      Ding Dong! LOL!

  19. Maybe Norman Tebbit is genuinely fearful that he may be arrested and prosecuted for the hate-speech against minorities which he, himself, may have used when he was a young man! Maybe Tebbit feels that if his conduct as a young man were to be closely examined today, he could find himself in the dock!

  20. soapbubblequeen 3 Nov 2013, 6:04pm

    Does anyone take Norman “Psycho” TeBates seriously? I actually hope he lives long enough to see a lesbian queen on the throne, just so it annoys him!

  21. A pardon? What good, a pardon, to a dead man?

    An apology to the living would do some good to reassure the living, today, what happened to Alan will not happen to us.

    The piecemeal steps, such as civil partnerships and only then marriage, re-enforce the tenuous relationship we still experience with ‘authorities.’

    You apologize to people you regard and treat as human beings, now. You pardon, only yourselves today, for past injustices.

  22. Okay, “Lord” Tebbit, what exactly have you done in the service of mankind, to earn your exhaulted status as one fit to judge a giant, such as Alan Turing? You’re clearly unfit to judge so much as a dog show. Get over your “Lordly” self.

  23. Nobody cares what this walking dead fossil thinks. Has anybody paid any serious attention to him since the 90s? I don’t think so. His epitaph should read “I damaged the Tory party in ways not even Labour could.”

  24. What is being ignored is that a pardon involves forgiving a crime. Some convicted of offences they assert they did not commit decline to accept pardons because they only confirm their guilt. Some will accept them because it avoids going for a re-trial or getting the conviction quashed and a pardon is at least an acknowledgement that something somewhere went wrong. Gordon Brown’s statement is in my view worth more than a pardon because it was an acknowledgement by government that the law was once oppressive. I agree with others that singling out Turing is quite wrong as it ignores not only other famous people but all those convicted under laws now repealed, whether sexual offences or not. If Turing gets his pardon, within a week it will be forgotten. Whilst the lot of gay people has improved tremendously, the fact is that 2 out of 5 young gays have contemplated or attempted suicide. Directing our energies into making sure that changes is a far better memorial to Turing than a pardon.

    1. James Campbell 24 Dec 2013, 5:36pm

      I am not gay, but my brother is and professionally, I work with suicidal young people, some of whom are gay. I support the rights of all LGBTI people. Turing, of course, is not in position to decline the pardon. Despite the legal detail of a pardon not actually quashing a conviction, I disagree that it will be forgotten a in a week. Turing’s pardon has echoed around the UK and the world and highlights the gross injustice of regarding homosexuality as a crime. People who had never heard of Turing (the UK does not honour true heroes like they do in other countries) have spoken to me about the case, appalled at how he was treated. I hope it will prove to be a trojan horse to escalate the pardon of ALL who were convicted.

  25. J.M. Turing 16 Jan, 9:33pm

    I hope that this pardon by the Queen herself will open the door to have Alan Knighted as he is much deserving of it for the tremendous work that he did for all of us living today.

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