The inaugural PinkNews Awards were hosted by the Speaker of the House of Commons, John Bercow, this evening, in the State Rooms, Speaker’s House, the Palace of Westminster.

The awards were presented to recognise the contributions of politicians, businesses and community campaigning groups to advancing LGBT life across the UK.

The speaker, as well as guests including Helen Grant, Equalities Minister, and Nick Clegg, Deputy Prime Minister all commended PinkNews, and efforts to pass equal marriage law, but emphasised the need to do more for moves to equality.

Also in attendance were Coronation Street actor Charlie Condou, and Ollie Locke of Made in Chelsea fame. 

The list of winners is available to view below.

Community Group of the Year (Voted on by 1,322 readers)
Winners: Out4Marriage, Lobby A Lord, Coalition for Equal marriage and Equal Marriage (From the Scottish Equality Network)

Advertising Campaign of the Year (Voted on by 947 readers)
Winner: Amazon Kindle

Business Network of the Year (judged award)
Winner: InterTech

Parliamentary Speech of the Year (Voted on by more than 4,000 readers)
Winner: Mike Freer MP

Politician of the Year (judged award)
Winners: Rt Hon Yvette Cooper and Baroness Stowell of Beeston

Prime Minister David Cameron tweeted his support for the awards.

The deputy editor of PinkNews proposed to his partner at the website’s awards ceremony at the Houses of Parliament tonight, and was congratulated by the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg.

The judges of the Business Network of the Year and the Politician of the Year were:-
Iain Dale, Presenter LBC
Mike Freer, MP for Finchley and Golders Green
Tom Copley, London Assembly Member (Labour London wide)
Baroness Olly Grender
Anna Doble, Head of Online, Channel 4
Paris Lees, Columnist GT (Gay Times), Diva and the Independent
Simon Topham, Managing Director GT and Diva
Donna Halkyard, Head of Diversity, BAE Systems
Tom French, the Scottish Equality Network
Corinne Pinfold, former reporter, PinkNews, policy officer, School Leader Support Service