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Comment: Drug use on the gay scene needs to be acknowledged in the fight against HIV

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  1. Very interesting article. It seems the “scene” in London is much different than Liverpool; here we have gay guys doing MDMA or ketamine on nights out, but I’ve yet to hear about any kind of “sex party”. The “straight scene” is almost identical though.

    Drugs are like alcohol; most people are responsible and safe but some people abuse it. I think drug abuse (not use) in the gay community can be linked directly to mental health. People use drugs as a short term remedy for long term mental health issues. Addiction is slavery; you will do anything for your master. You’ll lie, steal and kill a man in cold blood for your master. He will take everything; your money, your friends, your family, until the only thing you have left is your life and you’ll happily give him that to please him. You will do anything to please your master, and his touch is all that matters to you.

    Russell Brand done a fantastic documentary about addiction and recovery and I encourage everybody to watch it.

    1. I not only love what you said but how you said it! So apt

  2. Colin (London) 4 Oct 2013, 3:14pm

    We really do need to get a handle on this.
    I absolutely agree that “It starts with me”

    Then how about the scene. Why is it that Boyz and QX are full of semi naked beautiful guys partying and you can see many eyes are on drugs. I’m really sorry but QX are part of the problem….sex, sex clubs, scene etc and I’ve been there as well.

    Young impressionable people coming to London for work and to explore themselves as i did as well. shy going to pubs drinking a little too much for a shag. Then one night someone says have you tried……

    Yes a few times and it’s the normal but actually it’s not and the gay magazines and venues need to take some responsibility for this.

    If it gets to the medical services then it’s too late.

    Be a good friend and encourage your mates to be sensible. Have more condoms with you than you could possibly use and share them.

    And if the £ medical cost of our out of control behaviour is getting out of the range of our straight peer groups ch

    1. Colin (London) 4 Oct 2013, 3:17pm

      charge the venues, the magazines, the apps, the websites etc. They must share the responsibility to protect our own.

      Some of my friends are no longer with us today through drug use. I do not seek to be cut the fun but to promote safe and responsible fun.

      I want all drugs legalised so they can be controlled safely.

      1. Colin (London) 4 Oct 2013, 3:26pm

        So many gay people live by themselves and have little emotional outlets. We need drop in centres ,community centres in Soho and Vauxhall (Or around the country) run by experienced and trained gay people to buddy new people if they need help.

        1. Good series of posts, Colin. The magazines, the clubs, the sex-on-site venues and the saunas all need to take responsibility and quit doing what they’ve been doing for about 20 years.

  3. ….well you know what? Orgasms actually come at a price. Considering many young gay men always have sex on drugs—so their immune systems are made more vulnerable by the ecstatic euphoria!!

  4. Drugs and HIV/Aids charities need to talk this up as a problem – that’s how they get funding.
    Why didn’t you talk to anyone else?

    To quote William Burroughs; “Just say no… to drugs hysteria.”

    And as with gay sex, let people be sovereign over their own bodies.

  5. It would be interesting to see a breakdown of the drug profile for cities across the uk to compare directly with the stats around HIV contraction and spread.

    I find it annoying when the all-encompassing word, ‘drugs’ is used as it so often doesn’t include pharma drugs and alcohol is separated out as a special case.

  6. Gay_News_Now on twitter 5 Oct 2013, 12:09am

    Why do we demonize and criminilize having a disease? The stigma and limelight should be focused on BIG PHARM and the LACK of a cure. Just recently, after millions and millions of dollars and research and droves of dead bodies did they discover that anti-fungal foot cream causes hiv to kill itself. Doesn’t anyone find this odd?

  7. Oh here we go again. This topic come up in PinkNews at least twice a year. Why are you targeting drugs? I’m pretty sure alcohol has caused more HIV infections than drugs (people being so drunk they forget to wear a condom, poor judgement, etc). Usually when you are on “club drugs” like E, it’s virtually impossible to get it up. That’s not to say you couldn’t bottom, but then you wouldn’t have that sexual urge in your libido. The writer of this article is targeting meth. So why not come out and say it? The author is also referring to these infamous “PNP parties”. Talk about a round about way to make a point. Writing for writing’s sake. Poor journalism.

    1. Sister Mary Clarence 6 Oct 2013, 4:03pm

      Could not agree with you less – the ‘freedom’ we enjoy to take recreational drugs is utterly destroying lives and the sooner the gay community wakes up to that reality the better.

      GBH, GBL, Meth, Coke, Ecstacy, MDMA, Speed, Acid – it makes no difference – the gay community has developed an entirely high and mighty attitude towards drugs and its as though no one has the right to criticise, or even offer words of caution.

      It is a road to destruction and yet its become so un-politically correct to tell people to sort their lives out.

  8. Mark. Devon 11 Oct 2013, 10:05am

    As a non Londoner but someone who fairly regularly goes up for a couple of good nights the drug culture seems to have changed drastically over the last 18 months from MDMA, Coke and Ketamine and more & more people are taking Tina. I’ve seen friends who are shadows of their former self. You’re article is quite right that the correlation between drug use & unsafe sex needs to be addressed together.

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