An MP in Kazakhstan has called for a new law which would ban “homosexual relations”, as he questioned why gay rights should be advocated if gay people do not produce children, and whether gay men could adequately guard the country’s borders.

Deputy Bakhytbek Smagul noted countries such as Russia, which in June passed a law banning the promotion of “non traditional” relationships, in his calls to “root out homosexual relations”, reports Eurasia.

On Tuesday, the Deputy, who sits in parliament for the ruling Nur Otan party, which is headed by President Nursultan Nazarbayev, touched on family values, demographics, and Kazakhstan’s “national mentality” in his arguments against gay rights.

“It is obvious that when the Kazakhstani national ideology is being shaped we cannot look at the future of the nation outside the family,” Smagul said.

“However, it is worth pondering what the level of development of the institution of the family will be in a country if such homosexual relations are openly advocated. In Central Asia, where ancient cultures intersect, and [in Kazakhstan,] as a state that is an active member of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference, this phenomenon damages the image of our country and its domestic policy.”

Politicians in the country rarely turn to Afghanistan, but Smagul noted that homosexuality is criminalised there, as well as Malaysia, where it is illegal, and Indonesia, where it is not illegal, but same-sex relationships are taboo.

He then went on to suggest that support and protection for gay and lesbian people is more common in regions which do not face security threats.

He said: “Our country is located in a strategic region, where we have to be on our guard day and night”, going on to quesion how “men with a different orientation”, could effectively guard the borders of the country.

Continuing, he asked: “What contribution will [homosexuals] make to our country’s demography?”

Smagul has requested of Prime Minister Serik Akhmetov to consider a bid for an anti-gay bull, but government officials have so far declined to comment in the debate.

Earlier this week Deputy Kairbek Suleymenov cried out for “mechanisms” to go against equal marriage, which he said is “alien to Kazakhstani psychology”, and “traditions”, despite there being no plans for an equal marriage law there.