The administration of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has, as expected, filed an appeal against a ruling last week that equal marriage be made legal in the state.

Judge Mary Jacobson on Friday ruled that because the US federal government now recognises same-sex marriage, the state government in New Jersey would violate its constitution by not doing so.

The Governor of the state, Chris Christie, has since said he plans to appeal against the ruling.

Writing to the Supreme Court of New Jersey on Monday, Attorney General John Hoffman cited “far reaching implications”, asking the court to reverse the decision.

The state Supreme Court does not normally rule unless an appeals court has made a decision in the case.

Hoffman has also appealed to Judge Jacobson to ask that a stay be placed on the issue of marriage licences in the state until the Supreme Court makes a ruling.

Democrats in the state have asked that Governor Christie give up his fight against equal marriage in the state, but have also said that if he does continue to do so, the top court is the place to decide the outcome.

The Governor has continually asserted that the issue of equal marriage should go to voters in a referendum, rather than the legislature or courts making a decision.

The US Supreme Court in June struck down the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), and ruled that civil unions do not provide the same benefits as marriage.

Christie in June said the opposite, and that the strike-down of DOMA “was wrong”.

Back in February, Democrats in the New Jersey legislature said they would attempt to override Governor Chris Christie’s equal marriage veto from last year, and have now agreed to put the question of marriage equality to voters in November, if they cannot override it.

Alongside Pennsylvania, New Jersey was the only north east state where same-sex marriage is not legal.