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UK: Footballers urged to wear rainbow laces in support of gay players

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  1. It’s a start. Let’s hope it gets a good level of participation. ‘It doesn’t matter which team you play for’.

  2. Sinead Harkin 16 Sep 2013, 11:23am

    It shouldn’t matter but unfortunately it still does,why did the Leeds player quit the game?Football is stills stuck in the 1950s

    1. He was not a Leeds player when he came out. He agreed to have his contract terminated to focus on he clothing range. He could not play in Europe because under players international licences he would have to have played a certain amount of international games in a year. Due to injuries he could not play for his club, he was even loaned out and got injured again.

      Robbie’s American contract was sold too a different club whilst he was in England without his agreement. Because of this he did not want to play for that particular club. When L.A. Galaxy bought his contract he agreed to start playing.

      The whole situation is not as black and white as it seems. Am sure if anybody were told to play or work for a club they did not want too am pretty sure most people would quit….

      1. Sinead Harkin 17 Sep 2013, 8:10am

        I stand corrected,I’m not a big follower of the game and just see how my local Championship team have done.

  3. And where can one find those laces? (In Brazil, chiefly)

  4. Perhaps any sort of corporate support is a good thing, but I have to say this campaign seems a bit of a damp squib. There could hardly be anything less conspicuous than bootlaces viewed from a distance.

    The slogan “Right Behind Gay Footballers” is also less than brilliant, at best being a rather juvenile nudge-nudge wink-wink innuendo.

    In fact, I wonder whether Paddy Power are just taking the mickey and dear old Stonewall have been too dim to realise. Paddy Power has a poor record with deliberately controversial, bad taste advertising, and this seems to fit the same pattern.

    I think we’re being used.

    1. If you’re correct that the bookmaker company is being insincere (I for one cannot see anything it would have to gain by such insincerity), then what better way of turning the tables on such childishness than seeing dozens and dozens, hundreds?, thousands??, of players and fans alike taking Stonewall’s message seriously and showing genuine support for gay professional footballers?

      1. Publicity.
        This allows them both sides of the coin. They can claim to be supportive of gay players and fans and follow the popular social change in the media, while giving a wink and a nod to all the homophobic players and fans too.

        Consider all the many thousands of options they could have used for a name for this campaign, and look at this again. This was a deliberate choice, it wasn’t accidental, Paddy Power is mocking Stonewall and getting plenty of low-cost or entirely free publicity too.

    2. You know, I thought exactly the same thing when I read the name of the campaign. They can’t possibly suggest that no one considered the name of this, and no one thought to stop and say it’s innuendo.

      Consider all the various options they could have had, all the many different variations. Why choose that one?

      This is Paddy Power getting a lot of free publicity, while being homophobic, and Stonewall have either been complicit for some goal they can see that we can’t, or they were just too stupid to see that they are being used by this company to take another swipe at gay players and fans.

    3. If you can see a link to the sponsor in my post above, it’s not my fault !

      It’s been added automatically by SkimLinks.

  5. Nice idea if a player chooses to wear these laces, but have to confess I have some reservations about all footballers being sent them and urged to put them on. Inevitably, some who don’t feel at all strongly about this will ask “what if we don’t want to?”
    And even if the heart is in the right place, who came up with ‘Right Behind Gay Footballers’ which cries out for jokes about… well, you know.
    Still, there will be a day when numerous gay players are out and I look forward to it.

    1. Robert in S. Kensington 16 Sep 2013, 12:34pm

      Yes, it occurred to me too….’Right Behind Gay Footballers’ could easily be construed as a double entendre. Perhaps they should have used another alternative…’Support Gay Footballers’? My gut feeling is not many will wear the laces, hope I’m proved wrong though.

      1. I have reservations about the name of campaign too.
        If they’d used ‘Right Beside Gay Footballers’, there’d be no entendre there. It would mirror that quote about friendship (I paraphrase) ‘Do not walk ahead of me; I may not follow. Do not walk behind me; I may not lead. Walk beside me and be my friend.’

        Well, currently they’re using the hashtag #RBGF on twitter. So, rather than squashing the campaign because of some badly chosen words, why not throw in the hashtag #RightBesideGayFootballers as well when mentioning it on twitter (since it’s the same use of initials anyway). And hopefully then, they might switch the name.

  6. Great stuff, in the past Paddy Power have done so much to combat transphobia too!

  7. Danny Norton 16 Sep 2013, 1:33pm

    They should have sent rainbow arm bands. Players sometimes wear black arm bands as a mark of respect. They’re much more noticeable than shoelaces. Not sure about the whole “right behind gay footballers” though. Stinks of entendre

  8. Right Behind Gay Footballers, brought to you by the charity that nominated Julie Bindel for an award and the bookmakers that invited us to play “Stallions and Mares” at Cheltenham.

    Really, count me out.

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