The president of a Catholic school in Minnesota has resigned after revealing that he has been in a same-sex relationship for nearly two decades.

Bill Hudson said that he had to step down after two years as the president of Totino-Grace High School in Minnesota so that he could live openly as the father of two children and the committed partner of a man.

In a written statement, he said: “I love the Totino-Grace community, however I need to be truthful about my life.

“I am in a committed same-sex relationship, and I felt the best course of action was to inform the school. I value my time at Totino-Grace as one of the most enriching experiences of my career.”

He called the decision on Friday “heartbreaking and painful” but said that it was important for him to lead an “authentic life’”

The resignation came after he had a standard meeting with two members of the school board, and they announced on Tuesday that the topic came up in their latest meeting when they had become aware about some “inconclusive” evidence.

Corporate board member Mark Motzel told The Star Tribune: “We asked him whether there was anything he felt we should know.

“He informed us that he was in a committed same-sex relationship.”

Mr Motzel did not reveal what they had learned about Mr Hudson prior to their meeting, but he said that their conversation was not adversarial.

“Bill served the Totino-Grace community well during his nine years at the school,” Mr Motzel said in a statement.

“That said, leading a Catholic school while living in a committed same-sex relationship is not consistent with the teachings of the Catholic Church. We thank him for his service and wish him well as he explores new professional opportunities.”

His time as president was the highlight of Mr Hudson’s nine-year-career at Totino-Grace high school.

Previously he worked as an executive director for the secondary schools department of the National Catholic Educational Association in Washington, DC, and was an assistant principal before that.

Mr Hudson said that after 20 years working for the Catholic Church in various forms, he found it “freeing to be open about the most important thing in my life.”