After having succeeded in her court battle against the Defense of Marriage Act, which was struck down by the US Supreme Court yesterday,  Edith Windsor has thrown her weight behind a candidate in the race for Mayor of New York.

Yesterday, the federally-sanctioned Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was struck down in the Supreme Court for being unconstitutional.

In the video, Windsor says: “I’m Edie Windsor and I want to tell you about another battle that’s very important to me, and that’s getting Christine Quinn elected the next mayor of New York. She’s open and generous and she’s smart. She understands the problems of managing a big city like New York. She comes of middle class background herself and has true compassion for the struggling middle class and the struggling working class and the struggling not-working class today. And you don’t find that very often,

“I hope everyone listening to me will not only vote for Chris themselves but in fact will spread the word, will educate everyone they care about. She’ll be great!”

As a result of today’s opinion, Ms Windsor, who was married to her partner, and who sued the government in order to get the federal estate tax deduction previously only available to straight people when their spouses die, will be eligible for a $363,000 (£236,000) tax refund.

City Council speaker Christine Quinn, formally announced that she will run for the position of NYC mayor, back in March. 

If elected to the post, Quinn would not only be the first openly gay mayor of New York City, but also the first female.

Earlier in May a Quinnipiac University poll released showed that 37% of Democratic voters favoured Quinn, which, if she continues to close in, could mean she could reach 40%, and avoid a run-off primary.

Quinn married her long time partner Kim Catullo, in New York City last May. In the memoir, Quinn wrote that Catullo said she could only be with a New York Yankees fan. ”I dumped the [New York] Mets in a hot second,” Quinn said.