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US: Legislation to fully repeal federal ban on same-sex marriage reintroduced

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  1. Robert in S. Kensington 27 Jun 2013, 6:42pm

    This is what I said in another post. DOMA isn’t completely gone. I applaud the Respect for Marriage Act but I don’t think it stands a chance in a republican controlled Congress which would filibuster it. Even if it reached the senate, it would need 60 votes, 50 Democrats and 10 republicans. There aren’t even 10 republicans in the House supporting SSM that I know of. Maybe our American friends could expand on this and correct me if I’m wrong.

    1. There are 54 senators supporting SSM: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_supporters_of_same-sex_marriage_in_the_United_States#U.S._Senators

      Maybe a few more would vote in favour once it’s up for a vote, but in the House it probably doesn’t stand a chance.

  2. Robert in S. Kensington 27 Jun 2013, 6:48pm

    I just learned that the bells of the National Episcopalian (Anglican) Cathedral pealed to celebrate the landmark ruling yesterday. Another reason why the Episcopalians should break with Canterbury once and for all. This would never happen at Westminster Abbey, St. Paul’s and definitely NOT Canterbury Cathedral.

  3. This bill is tantalisingly close to passing in the Senate but is quite far off in the House of Representatives.

    Don’t know about the committees, but in the American system they’re always good for a laugh.

    1. the Committe stage and then the floor stage!

      You need at least 60 votes (out of 100 votes) in the Senate for any legislation to pass – NOT 51!!!!!!!

  4. Tim Crowhurst 27 Jun 2013, 7:43pm

    Won’t happen.

    Amendments to the US Constitution need to get over 3 big hurdles: 2/3 supermajorities in both House (290/435) & Senate (67/100) and 3/4 supermajority of the states (38/50).

    That means just 13 states can block an amendment, and there are already that many which either have marriage equality already, or are waiting for a change in the law to take effect. There are also at least 7 where it could be legalised within the next few years.

    There simply aren’t enough states to pass a DOMA amendment to the US constitution.

    1. Tim crowhurst 27 Jun 2013, 7:47pm

      Just realised I posted this on the wrong article! Duh!

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