Openly gay New York City mayoral hopeful Christine Quinn, has released an extract from her autobiography, in which she reflects on sometimes feeling “a faint sense of unease”, that she might be judged for being gay.

In the extract of her memoir, published by the New York Times, Quinn says she accepted her sexuality two decades prior, but still sometimes felt uneasy.

“I have to admit that, like so many LGBT people, in the back of my mind I still have a faint sense of unease, wondering what people will think of me when I walk into unfamiliar situations, fearing they will judge me because of who I am,” she wrote.

City Council speaker Christine Quinn, formally announced that she will run for the position of NYC mayor in March. 

If elected to the post, Quinn would not only be the first openly gay mayor of New York City, but also the first female.

Earlier in May a Quinnipiac University poll released showed that 37% of Democratic voters favoured Quinn, which, if she continues to close in, could mean she could reach 40%, and avoid a run-off primary.

Quinn married her long time partner Kim Catullo, in New York City last May. In the memoir, Quinn wrote that Catullo said she could only be with a New York Yankees fan. “I dumped the [New York] Mets in a hot second,” Quinn said.

The memoir will be released on 11 June, and the primaries for New York City mayor will be held on 10 September.