A survey has found that, out of the population of the Faroe Islands, more than two thirds support legalising civil marriage for gay couples.

Out of the population of the 50,000 Faroese citizens, 68% said they favoured civil marriage for same-sex couples, meaning in town or city halls, but not in churches or religious organisations, with 27% against and 5% undecided.

The survey, conducted by Gallup, on behalf of LGBT Faroe Islands, found that 72% of women, and 65% of men said they supported equal marriage.

When divided by age, younger generations supported equal marriage, with 84% of 15 to 25 year olds, and 88% of 26 to 39 year olds in support.

There was no age group with more than half opposed to same-sex marriage, and it is only over 60s who had less than half in favour, with 48% for, 9% undecided and 43% against.

“This survey very clearly shows that the Faroese people want equal rights for same-sex couples in the Marriage Act. Hopefully the Parliament will recognize this and adopt the proposed amendment with as clear a majority as the one we see among the people,” says Eiler Fagraklett a Board member of LGBT Faroe Islands.

“This is a fantastic result and a breakthrough in our fight for equal rights. This is proof of our long-standing impression in LGBT Faroe Islands; the people in the Faroes are much more tolerant than the political panorama would suggest,” says Sonja Jógvansdóttir, who is on the Board of LGBT Faroe Islands.

A proposal to update the current Marriage Act, is to be submitted to the Faroese Parliament after 29 July, at the opening parliamentary session.

Last year 10% of the Faroese population gathered for the third gay pride parade, and this year it will take place in the capital city Torshavn, on 27 July.

The Faroe Islands is currently the only Nordic country without civil unions or equal marriage, and there are no laws allowing adoption or artificial insemination for gay couples.

The country introduced anti-discrimination laws based on sexual orientation after lengthy and aggressive debate, in 2006.