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London Evening Standard urges David Cameron to stick with same-sex marriage in order to be a ‘conviction politician’

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  1. 31% turnout for the local elections, ukip got 24% of that vote. hardly a force to be reckoned with. Why would we change.

    1. That There Other David 8 May 2013, 2:40pm

      Also the elections were only in rural areas and small towns in England, since unitary authorities and the other home nations weren’t involved. Most of the British population couldn’t have voted even if they’d wanted to.

    2. And of those who even did vote UKIP, just 12% said it was because of equal marriage. This is less than 1% of voters who the tory right are obsessing over.

  2. Robert in S. Kensington 8 May 2013, 2:07pm

    he Evening Standard has it absolutely right! There is no way David Cameron is going to ditch equal marriage now, too much political capital invested. It will go forward.

  3. Jock S. Trap 8 May 2013, 2:23pm

    Prime Ministers come and go but History decide who stands out.

    For David Cameron to back down would be a disaster for him and his party.

    For David Cameron to succeed with pushing this bill through history will record his achievements.

    That is until some religion bumcrack comes along and decides to change history, like they usually do.

    1. That There Other David 8 May 2013, 2:41pm

      Oh totally. For all their condemnation now David Cameron was Archibishop of Canterbury according to what they’ll tell people in 100 years.

  4. Can’t the govt give us a date for the report stage/third reading and when exactly it will be going to the Lords. Setting a definite timetable can’t be that hard surely!

    I’n not that bothered about it being in the Queen’s speech but it’s about time now they got on with it. The comittee stage ended ages ago without any amendments and so far there are just a few amendments tabled for the 3rd reading.

    I’ve seen various places now , including PN, that this is going to the Lords by the end of the month but I can’t see any official date anywhere.

    1. That There Other David 8 May 2013, 2:42pm

      Now that Parliament is sitting again the timetable should begin to firm up. A few more days until we start to get an idea of when it will be.

  5. If he backed down now he would be seen as a risible puppet of UKIPs. I believe he has more political nous than that.

  6. Cameron is the opposite of a conviction politician. Anybody who knows his history as an MP will know he was once an obstinate Thatcherite and social conservative and his views practically changed overnight when he ran for leader. Just about the last thing the Tories need if it ever hopes to secure an electoral majority again, is a ‘conviction politician’.

    The Tories’ only hope of that rests on a social liberal platform. The hardliners will feel deserted, but they’re not important. You can’t place your cards on a literally crumbling, dying demographic. Those who say Cameron is only worried about what the ‘gay lobby’ thinks of him are delusional. Less than 15% of 18-34 year olds consider immigration a priority issue and the generation gap on the topic of gay rights couldn’t be more manifest. Cameron is dealing with a crisis in his party.

    Still, if the Right never want to see another conservative majority government in their lifetime, it’s their funeral. Be my guest.

  7. Robert in S. Kensington 8 May 2013, 4:31pm

    Cameron knows that veering to far to the right will be the destruction of the Tory party and dash any future chance of re-election. He’s taken the party to the center similar to Labour. Miliband won’t fare well if he steers too far left either although Labour did quite well in the elections last week, gaining a substantial number of seats which really debunks the nonsense about equal marriage being a vote loser, be it Labour or Tory since Labour were the largest to give equal marriage a nod in February.

    The Evening Standard was spot on prior to the second reading encouraging Cameron to hang in there with equal marriage and they are right again this time.

  8. There was no mention of the bill legalising gay marriage, which was introduced in the last session and is being carried over into the new session. In contrast the energy bill, which is also being carried over, was mentioned. – source Guardian

    1. hun its on the cutting room floor as we say in the film industry..it has been shelved…see my post below

  9. The chicken has shelved it according to what is being reported on the BBC website its not going through in the next session…thats like a shelving to me. what a waste of time..

    Gay Marriage
    Despite having the support of David Cameron, legislation to allow gay marriage will not be brought forward in the next parliamentary session. Ben Summerskill, Chief Executive of the gay rights group Stonewall, said they would “fight on to push both coalition parties to deliver on their promise to implement this measure by 2015.” The Home Office said it was committed to introducing same sex marriage, but a consultation on the issue was still ongoing and it was never intended to be included in this Queen’s Speech.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17988236

    1. That report is from 2012. I think things have moved on a bit since then.

      1. oops sorry…

  10. This year audiences were wowed by Daniel Day Lewis’s portrayal of Abraham Lincoln…now, coming soon, David Cameron as Neville Chamberlain in The Great Appeaser! (and they thought Tony Blair could act…)

  11. come on David Cameron make that change stand up for equal marriage .
    all the other party’s wood not do it . OR IS JUST TALK & WASTING TIME MAKE YOUR MOVE ?

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