Britain’s first youth crime commissioner has quit, following a backlash which came after homophobic, racist and violent tweets were sent from her personal Twitter account.

Paris Brown, 17, was announced last week as Britain’s first youth crime commissioner, and had been set to work alongside Kent’s Police Crime Commissioner Ann Barnes. She had been intended to represent a youth perspective on policing and crime.

Brown announced today that she would step down from the position, and said she was “quitting in the interests of the young people of Kent”.

She continued to say: “I have made this decision after a great deal of thought and consultation with my family.

“I accept that I have made comments on social networking sites which have offended many people. I am really sorry for any offence caused… I strongly reiterate that I am not racist or homophobic.”

Kent Police Crime Commissioner Ann Barnes, who previously said she would stand by Brown, said it was “a very sad day”.

Brown previously issued a tearful apology after racist, homophobic and violent tweets which were discovered to have been sent from her personal Twitter account before she was appointed.

She had been set to receive a £15,000 salary, some of which would have been paid out of Barnes’ own £85,000.

The tweets, posted while she was between the ages of 14 and 16, included several offensive messages from her now closed personal Twitter account @vilulabelle, in which she use the words “fags”, “Illegals”, and “pikeys” to describe gay people, immigrants and travellers.

She also tweeted boasting about drug use, her sex life and saying that she wanted to “cut” somebody.

Yesterday, several MPs weighed in to say that the position should never have been created, some calling it a “gimmick”, and others saying that she should have resigned sooner.

Brown tweeted one supporter yestreday saying: “The last few days have been hell. Totally my fault and I am the only one to blame. I repeat I am sorry”.