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Twitter confusion over Margaret Thatcher’s death led users to believe Cher had died

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  1. I am embarrassed to say, I also misread that hashtag, although I knew that Cher wasn’t dead. It is easy to misread that mash of letters.

  2. Robert in S. Kensington 9 Apr 2013, 6:03pm

    Anyone with half of a brain would know that Cher isn’t 87.

    1. except the hashtag doesn’t say “nowthatcherisdeadat87″

  3. The Kitty Channel 9 Apr 2013, 7:45pm

    I guess most of the twitterati are too young to know the deceased’s name well enough to make the connection.

  4. That There Other David 9 Apr 2013, 8:26pm

    Hilarious. Especially the young person so ignorant of the world they only associate “Cher” with that god-awful Cher Lloyd :-)

    Glad to see that Cher (note the space) is still with us anyway.

  5. Cher’s alive? Who’d have known?

  6. ‘Her politics on gay issues proved to be divisive for the LGBT community’. WTF!!!!

    If, PN, you read the comments on the Thatcher death story, I think you’d come to the view that on more than almost any other topic, the LGBT community is at one.

    1. de Villiers 10 Apr 2013, 7:43am

      I am not sure that the LGBT community is at one. The division, as always, splits on the left / right line of politics.

      LGBT persons on the left are negative on Margaret Thatcher – although they may have been radicalised to the left by her. LGBT persons on the right seem to consider that the social conservatism is less important than the economic liberalism which enabled a culture of individualism and less social conservatism two decades after.

      France is much more on the left than the UK economically but is also much more socially conservative than it. There is not the same culture of unrestrained individuality whether in this way for gay people or for women.

      1. ‘Her politics on GAY issues’: sorry, M deVilliers, on this topic we are pretty united – re-read the comments on the Thatcher story. A part de vous, évidement.

        1. de Villiers 10 Apr 2013, 11:45am

          It means not much to me. I was never living here whilst she was the Prime Ministre. But there is a disaccord between those on the right and those on the left. The few people who have written the positives messages have been marked down severely.

          People genuinely seem to have been traumatised by her – but she still won three parliamentaires.

          1. de Villiers, Peoples reaction on her passing has shocked many around the world, because of her involvement in global politics. Her domestic policies were the cause of vitriolic outpouring.

            During her time, she became the most hated prime minister the UK recalls in recent memory. Although she is credited by some tor making the UK the global and financial powerhouse it now is..

            Whilst PM, her domestic policy was deeply divisive Her policies affecting the gay community whilst significant, are only part of the reason so many people are so vitriolic. Her policies and taxes destroyed whole industries and communities in UK. The impact broke up many families and many have never recovered. She impoverished a whole class of people and generation unlikely to ever speak well of, or forgive her.

            The miners strike is only a part of this reaction, but I do say if you want to see why the country has reacted the way it has watch “Billie Elliot” it depicts so well the despair caused in the 80′s.

  7. GingerlyColors 10 Apr 2013, 7:15am

    Oops! Echos of last year’s hashtag concerning Susan Boyle’s album launch party which should have ended up reading #susanalbumparty but the first three letters got omited. Care needs to be taken when creating hashtags and domain names.
    Years ago I saw a joke that Cher used to be Prime Minister so it is nothing new to me.
    Margaret Thatcher certainly did polarise opinion, even within the LGBT community and will continue to do so for decades to come.

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