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Sussex Police tipped to become the next force to record attacks on subculture groups

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  1. It’s a good idea to record hate attacks in this way. Then we can see what’s happening and what needs to be done.

    However, I don’t approve of treating equal crimes differently.

    For example, if I’m attacked by someone shouting ‘Four Eyes !’, why should this be treated any differently than if the shout was ‘Queer !’ ?

    Although it’s doubtless well-intentioned, this discrimination sends out all the wrong messages.
    It’s a bit like the Middle East custom of saying a woman is worth half a man.

    We can’t fight for equality and then ask to be treated differently, i.e. more favourably than equally.

  2. Excellent news. As a supporter of hate crime legislation, I’d been hoping the definition of hate crime would be getting expanded like this.

    Targetting someone based on their demographic is essentially a form of social cleansing. That is, the effects of a demographically targetted assault sends a message, a warning, to others in that demographic that they risk targetting, too.

    Neither an assault based on personal dislike for a person (not their demographic) nor an entirely random assault send that kind of message.

    This is why hate crimes are, and should, result in harsher punishment: the perpetrator is committing two crimes.

    If one believes hate crimes shouldn’t exist, then it naturally follows that it shouldn’t be a punishable offence to use racist or homophobic language. Criminals are punished for such language in addition to the crime of harassment, much in the same way hate crimes work.

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