Elton John and David Furnish may be planning several weddings, for when equal marriage is legal in the UK, and in Los Angeles, when it becomes legal there.

In October, Sir Elton called on the government not to concede to the opponents of equal marriage and said he would “love nothing more than to make history again” by turning his civil partnership into a marriage.

The pop veteran spoke movingly of his 19-year-long relationship to partner David Furnish, and urged the government to press ahead with its plans for equal marriage. The pair entered into a civil partnership in the UK in 2005.

According to Hollyscoop, Mr Furnish incorrectly said that equal marriage was legal in the UK, but said that the couple would return to Britain to renew their vows, as well as doing the same in LA once equal marriage is legal there.

He said: “Los Angeles is like a second home to us,” he said. “We have a civil partnership, but gay marriage has now been legalised in the UK.

“When we go back to Britain, we will definitely renew our vows under the gay marriage act but to do it here in Los Angeles, which is a second home to us, we’d love to do it here too!”

Suggesting that he and Sir Elton may hold more weddings elsewhere, he went on to say “Let’s renew those vows everywhere they become legal!”

He went on to say that their doing so would be in solidarity with equal marriage efforts around the world.

“It is one of the pivotal defining issues of our time and this moment has arrived and even though we have our relationship legally recognized, people are fighting hard for this issue everyday and deservedly so,” he tells us, “If we can give it profile and support, we’ll continue to do that.”

In January, Sir Elton and David Furnish welcomed their second child, and said they were “overwhelmed with happiness and excitement”. 

The couple welcomed Elijah Joseph Daniel Furnish-John, who was born at 6.40pm on Friday 11 January. He was born at 8lb 4oz, and was a much- wanted brother for the couple’s first child, two-year-old Zachary,

Earlier in February, MPs in the British Parliament voted in favour of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill by 400 to 175, a majority of 225.

The bill will now receive greater parliamentary scrutiny with LGBT stakeholders being asked to share their thoughts about the bill – after the committee has completed its work – the bill will then be subjected to another vote (third reading) by MPs and it will then undergo a similar process in the House of Lords.

In the US, the Supreme Court is due on 26 March to take up the case of whether to overturn Proposition 8, which in 2008 added a clause to the Californian constitution stating that marriage could only be recognised by the state if it were between a man and a woman, causing widespread controversy.