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Gaydar and Grindr remove dangerous ‘cool gene’ HIV immunity advert

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  1. This was picked up on Twitter yesterday with Lisa Power from THT taking the initiative and contacting Grindr directly to have the ad removed.

    Community Activists, HIV charities, the British HIV Association, and others have all condemned this ad.

    I contacted the company offering the test via email to voice my concern – I got a rather bog standard “complaint” response but the company involved have suggested they are reviewing the description of the test.

    This has been a great example of several groups working together to ensure gay men are protected from these “fast buck” companies!

    Well THT, GMFA & others for taking the lead on this matter!

  2. ugh, this made me ill. The ‘cool gene’, cause you know everyone with HIV has loser gene’s! Greed > responsibility, once again companies willling to spread mis-information in order to profit from the oppression of the gay community and with-holding of proper safer sex information fromt he government.

  3. Appalling attempt to profiteer by trading on people’s fears and seeming to provide solid scientific evidence simply by linking URLs to various scientific papers to extraordinary generalizations.

    Glad that they’ve been stopped from advertising in two remunerative outlets at least. BUT these profiteers will no doubt continue with their operation via other means, through other conduits.

    Ideally they should be closed down. Surely the Health Department should step in here.

  4. I think there’s a much wider issue in respect of grindr (and other aps) and the spread of HIV than an erroneous ad, to be honest.

    The fact that there the app, with others, encourages an already at-risk group to engage in casual sexual encounters with strangers is perhaps a bigger talking point than an ad. In my opinion of course.

  5. WTF is Gaydar doing even ALLOWING this ad?

  6. Guys, noone says that you can stop using condoms after knowing you have the rare gene. Don’t you know there are sooooooo many other diseases you can get except from HIV? :D

    Btw, almost everyone (also me) doesnt have the immunity. For me it was just another strong reminder to be as careful as possible. So from statistical point of view, the test HELPS to fight HIV, not spreads it!

    So stop complaining and start using your own brain for once :)

    1. A representative of the company, or, judging from the use of emoticons, simply a cretin.

      1. Sorry, not a representative – only person judging using common sense. Would recommend it for you too :)

  7. looks like a drive to get a pool of willing gayney pigs to experiment on like in the 70s with the hep c vaccine that actually caused the aids epidemic. Hopefully no one will fall for it this time

  8. The company providing this test have issued a statement on their website apologising to anyone who felt misled by the test & have confirmed they are reviewing the test.

    Very good news me thins – well done to all who were involved in this, esp Lisa Power who got the ad removed from Grindr.

  9. You guys are hilarious. Nowhere on the site or in the ad does it promote unsafe sex. They say a SMALL PERCENTAGE of people MAY have PARTIAL immunity. If anything it encourages being extra careful. The majority of people who jumped on the “omg terrible” bandwagon not only understand anything about genetics (“I’ve never heard of this! It must be a lie!”) nor bothered to read into it through the information provided by the service. I agree with D. here in the thread, people should use their own brains for once. But having an opinion different from your own apparently makes you a “cretin”.

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