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European Union High Representative pushes Russia to drop anti-gay law

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  1. GulliverUK 30 Jan 2013, 6:06pm

    Once again LGBT people are in the middle of a political struggle. Putin is incredibly unpopular and only managed to hold on to power with vote-rigging. Russians have been brought up in a culture of stupidity, educated to be homophobic and mistrustful of anything western, and the Russian Orthodox church is worse than the Catholic church in terms of homophobia. Putin needs their help to survive, and this is the price of their vote.

    How else do you explain why a supposedly first world country implements third-world social policies like Mali, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Cameroon?

    We could boycott Russian goods, but since they don’t export anything other than oil/gas it’s difficult, but certainly it should be considered off-limits for holidays, etc. And large companies should be discouraged from setting up there. EU pressure should be brought to bear, and the UK government should consider suspending visa services. Petitions have been tried and failed.

  2. “Russians have been brought up in a culture of stupidity, educated to be homophobic and mistrustful of anything western”

    Это не так!

    Please leave stereotyping to Putin and his cohort of numpties. The Russian education system does its best to teach under very trying circumstances. It is a) incorrect and b) disrespectful to many hard-working, ill-paid teachers to suggest otherwise.

    1. GulliverUK 30 Jan 2013, 7:33pm

      I’m going by what I’ve been told by Russian people ONLINE, recently. Those were his views. Given that so many people “appear” to approve of this legislation, and it passes by a massive, almost overwhelming majority, then I can only conclude the he was right. If people who are gay aren’t out in Russian then it’s understandable that they’ll be in the same position we were in the 60s, with people fearing the people they don’t even see.

      Even if gay people become much more visible in Russia it will take decades before they start to achieve the start of equal rights, protections, a more healthy atmosphere — at the moment it’s all going the wrong way, hence the petitions, condemnation from many governments, and the cutting off of cultural arrangements – Russia is being isolated, and it’s their own fault. I really wish the Orthodox church hadn’t been able to able to wield this power over Putin. Russia needs to get rid of Putin, any way possible.

      1. GulliverUK 30 Jan 2013, 7:35pm

        btw, I’m giving you a tick because we want to know these things, and I want to be corrected if I’m wrong, and I want to hear what it’s like in other places in the world. The Russian thing makes me mad, because I’ve signed those petitions time and time again, and it does nothing. Even condemnation seems to do nothing.

      2. Very few Russians would disagree with much of what you say. And I’m certainly not here to suggest you are mistaken in the main thrust of your argument. However, I do say that the view you presented is rather simplistic.

        Being gay and Russian (or Ukrainian) is not much fun, and is in many situations downright dangerous. While many (indeed, most) young Russians are perfectly at ease with sexualities of all kinds, many older Russians and those whom Putin favours are dangerous and powerful. This will take time – probably a generation – to change.

        Sp while I agree with you that far, lines like “brought up in a culture of stupidity, educated to be homophobic and mistrustful of anything western” are simply untrue.

        If you would care to join http://www.vk.com (the Russian Facebook clone) you would a) make a lot of new friends and b) have a greater chance of meeting a cross-section of Russians.

        Russia is by no means a happy, carefree land. Its problems are immense…

        1. and the solutions are a long way off.

          But its is not (yet) a basket case and, contrary to received wisdom, its not stupid, anti-western or even cursed with a population who are innately bigoted. I hope you’ll join us on VK and get a wider perspective. You will be most welcome.

          1. PS: I would also give you a green tick, but the system seems not to be working. Again!

  3. Well that’ll work!

    Still, nice of her to say it anyway.

    And while we’re at it, how about getting some of our EU neighbours into line.

    1. We tend to ridicule the EU in this country thanks to the full time onslaught against it by vested interests here. In actual fact statements made by the EU carry quite a lot of weight and do affect actions in other countries.

      It is one of the many plus points of speaking as one.

      If Russia didn’t give a toss what we thought why would they sign the European declaration of human rights?

      1. Great! Our LGBT friends in Russia can expect some good news.

        You would think that if we have that much influence in Russia, then bringing our friends in easterly parts of the EU into line would be a doddle. So what’s going on there?

        I share your passion for the EU, but let’s keep it real. Ashton is not exactly a big hitter.

  4. And Russia just laughs.

    Russia’s only concern about Europe is the money and trade.

  5. Russia has never enjoyed a period where it has not had a significant minority of thugs. Don’t let its cultural and scientific achievements fool you. From the autocracy of the tsars to revolutionary atrocities, to the current pseudo-politics it has under Putin……whether it be the working class or the upper class, the culture of ‘big actions for big times’ has been constant.

    The key issue is that the military seamlessly civilianised itself after the fall of the USSR, and has encouraged a latent skinhead culture to grow and grow. Putin is the figurehead but there are hundreds more in the state bureaucracy who are massively racist and homophobic. It’s incredibly sad.

    China and Russia need to get a grip. Brazil and India are showing how a large country can be both democratic and successful.

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